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Month: December 2014

California Law Requiring Anti-Bullying Training in the Workplace Goes Into Effect in the New Year

California Law Requiring Anti-Bullying Training in the Workplace Goes Into Effect in the New Year

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits harassment in the workplace, but only when the harassment is based on a protected characteristic, such as race or gender. But what if someone torments you because they don’t like your personality? Or you have a boss who constantly screams at you and everyone else in the office? This type of bullying behavior is unfortunately not uncommon in the workplace. But there’s no federal law that makes it illegal or…

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Supreme Court: Officers Don’t Need to Know (all) the Law

Supreme Court: Officers Don’t Need to Know (all) the Law

Ignorance of the law is no defense. You may have heard of this legal maxim, which is meant to convey that, in most instances, doing something illegal is—well, illegal—even if you didn’t know it was illegal. In essence, you’re credited with knowing the law, whether or not you do. But what about the other side of the coin? What if an officer believes some act violates the law when it really doesn’t, and detains you due to that mistaken belief?…

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Oh No, Now We Have to Worry About Hackers Stealing Funds Wired for Home Purchases?

Oh No, Now We Have to Worry About Hackers Stealing Funds Wired for Home Purchases?

When making what’s widely referred to as the biggest purchase of one’s life, the last thing you want to worry about is whether some criminal could divert your money elsewhere. In fact, the whole existence of the escrow process is so that you can safely park your money with a neutral, professional third party before releasing it to the home seller. (Learn more about this in Nolo’s articles on “Escrow and Closing.”) Technological improvements in the money transfer process mean that you…

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U.S. Supreme Court Considers Pregnant Employees’ Rights to Accommodation

U.S. Supreme Court Considers Pregnant Employees’ Rights to Accommodation

In 2006, a female United Parcel Service (UPS) driver named Peggy Young became pregnant with her first child. On her doctor’s orders, she was not to lift more than 20 pounds during her pregnancy. Because Peggy’s shifts usually involved delivering letters and small packages, it didn’t seem like the restriction would have a huge impact on her job. But when Peggy told her supervisor about the 20-pound restriction, she was told that heavy lifting was an essential part of her…

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