Monthly Archives: October 2016

Halloween Décor Spending at Odds With Tiny House Trend!

hallwThe pumpkins, plastic gravestones, oddly placed fake spiderwebbing, and other home and yard decorations are making their yearly appearance.

In fact, according to the National Retail Federation’s annual study, 70% of Americans plan to decorate their home for Halloween in 2016, spending a collective $2.4 billion to do so.

For anyone with a practical bent, the truly scary thing is having to store all those items after Halloween is over. (With the exception of the carved pumpkins, of course, which will rot nicely in one’s compost bin.) Their closets might already be full of Halloween costumes, which 67% of Americans plan to buy this year, spending a collective $3.1 billion.

Meanwhile, fascination with tiny homes is big in the real estate world, particularly among millennials. The topic has given rise to blogs, books, websites, and even television programs.

What’s “tiny,” exactly? It’s a home that’s smaller than some people’s living room, at around 400 square feet.

Tiny homes are a good way to remain debt-free—but the closets don’t offer much space for, say, plastic gravestones. Perhaps that’s why the actual number of people purchasing tiny homes to live in remains in the thousands, according to a USA TODAY report.

If you can limit your Halloween décor to compostables, and are intrigued by tiny homes, be sure to check out attorney Will Van Vactor’s series of articles on laws concerning tiny homes in various U.S. states.

Nolo Contributing Author Kyle Knapp Volunteers in Dilley, Texas Detention Center

dilleyWondering why you haven’t read any new immigration-law articles by Nolo contributing author Kyle Knapp lately? Kyle just returned from a week in Dilley, Texas, site of the nation’s largest immigration detention center.

He volunteered his time to provide legal assistance to migrants held there–numerous migrants.

His experience provides a powerful reminder that, while the flow of Central American migrants has slowed and the news headlines all but disappeared, the human need continues.


“We helped 263 women prepare for their ‘credible fear interviews‘ to get them past the first hurdle in applying for asylum and getting out of the prison. The prison has capacity for 2,400 people, and there are 1,200 there now. If it were at capacity, I don’t think we’d ever be able to help them all. Working in the ‘visitation center,’ every time you look up, there’s another group of 15 to 30 women waiting for either intake or consultations,” Kyle explains.

Kudos to Kyle, and to the Catholic Legal Immigration Network, the American Immigration Council, the Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services, and the American Immigration Lawyers Association, collectively known as CARA, which have joined forces to coordinate lawyers to volunteer at this and other U.S. immigration detention centers.

Trouble Selling Your Luxury Home? At Least You’re Not a Celebrity!

clock and faceAre Americans less starry-eyed about celebrities than they used to be? (Hard to believe, with a reality-TV star a nominee for the U.S. presidency.)

Or is there some other explanation for the fact that, according to a widely reported Redfin study, celeb-owned properties sit on the market for “about 36 days longer than other homes and they usually sell for less than the original asking price,” and in some cases for less than the amount they purchased it for?

One theory posited by Redfin is that, during their period of homeownership, celebrities tend to think less about resale value than about satisfying their own, possibly unusual, tastes. If they want a basketball court in the basement, so be it.

Another theory is that the privacy that major stars in the world of sports, movies, music, and so on must maintain–and the fear of being overrun by curious “looky-lous”–makes it difficult to open the house up to visitors. (Agents for buyers must convince the selling agent that the buyers are serious, and sometimes put them through a screening process.)

It’s bad enough to be an ordinary homeowner wondering about whether the open-house visitors will steal your prescription pills: Imagine worrying about whether visitors will not only steal the pills, but go to the media about what meds you’re on! (See “Theft During House Showing: What Can We Do?” for more on this issue.)

Still, bemoaning the inability to hold open houses is rather ironic, when you consider how much ink the real estate industry has spilled about whether open houses are actually worth the time and effort. So if you’re a nobody, you might as well revel in your nobody-ness, open your house to the public, and enjoy the benefits of having a stream of visitors.

For more tips and strategies, see Selling Your Home: Nolo’s Essential Guide.