Halloween Décor Spending at Odds With Tiny House Trend!

hallwThe pumpkins, plastic gravestones, oddly placed fake spiderwebbing, and other home and yard decorations are making their yearly appearance.

In fact, according to the National Retail Federation’s annual study, 70% of Americans plan to decorate their home for Halloween in 2016, spending a collective $2.4 billion to do so.

For anyone with a practical bent, the truly scary thing is having to store all those items after Halloween is over. (With the exception of the carved pumpkins, of course, which will rot nicely in one’s compost bin.) Their closets might already be full of Halloween costumes, which 67% of Americans plan to buy this year, spending a collective $3.1 billion.

Meanwhile, fascination with tiny homes is big in the real estate world, particularly among millennials. The topic has given rise to blogs, books, websites, and even television programs.

What’s “tiny,” exactly? It’s a home that’s smaller than some people’s living room, at around 400 square feet.

Tiny homes are a good way to remain debt-free—but the closets don’t offer much space for, say, plastic gravestones. Perhaps that’s why the actual number of people purchasing tiny homes to live in remains in the thousands, according to a USA TODAY report.

If you can limit your Halloween décor to compostables, and are intrigued by tiny homes, be sure to check out attorney Will Van Vactor’s series of articles on laws concerning tiny homes in various U.S. states.