If Obama Was “Deporter in Chief,” What Will Trump Be?

10year92_lgDuring President-Elect Donald Trump’s November 13, 2016 “60 Minutes” interview, he vowed to immediately deport up to three million immigrants. According to him, the U.S. needs to remove people who “are criminal and have criminal records, gang members, drug dealers.”

It sounds like a bold plan—but is it different from existing policy?

During President Barack Obama’s eight years in office, he earned the nickname “Deporter in Chief” from various immigration advocacy groups. His administration reportedly deported more than 2.5 million people from the United States.

And that doesn’t count the million-plus undocumented people who left the U.S. voluntarily or “self-deported” in recent years—in the case of Mexico, numbers that a Pew report said were higher than the number entering, as of late 2015.

And who, exactly, was tops on the list for the Obama administration’s deportation efforts? You can read the list yourself, in a 2011 memo by the Director of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

The memo explains that ICE’s top enforcement priorities (given that the agency lacks the resources with which to deport or remove every undocumented or otherwise deportable immigrant in the United States) include:

  • individuals who pose a clear risk to national security
  • serious felons, repeat offenders, or individuals with a lengthy criminal record of any kind
  • known gang members or other individuals who pose a clear danger to public safety, and
  • individuals with an egregious record of immigration violations, including those with a record of illegal re-entry and those who have engaged in immigration fraud.

Sound familiar? But according to Donald Trump, there are still three million criminals who haven’t been deported. Except that his numbers don’t seem to have a verifiable source. According to a 2015 study from the Migration Policy Institute, there are a mere 300,000 first-priority undocumented felons in the U.S. and 390,000 “serious misdemeanants.”

It’s little wonder that immigrants’ rights groups are raising concerns that Trump’s intention is to create a pretext with which to justify massive deportations regardless of criminal backgrounds.