Undocumented Parents in U.S. Face Reality of Possible Separation

One of the more popular new articles on Nolo’s website is called “Arrest by ICE: How Can I Arrange to Protect My Child in the Event of Deportation?

The reason is obvious: Statements and order by Trump Administration officials express hostility toward the entire U.S. undocumented population, and recent actions by officers of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) indicate that it has wasted no time in acting upon this new mandate.

By way of background, the Obama administration also deported large numbers of undocumented immigrants–so many that President Obama was dubbed “Deporter-in-Chief” by immigration advocates.

But it also sought to conserve ICE resources by setting clear priorities: Undocumented immigrants with close family and community ties were to be largely left alone, so that ICE’s limited energies could be directed toward people who had committed crimes or were deemed to be security risks.

That set of priorities, and the predictability that came with it, is essentially gone. Thus we hear news reports of, for example:

  • U.S. citizen children watching as their mother, who has lived in the U.S. for 21 years, is taken away in an ICE van.
  • Deportation of another mother of U.S. citizen children, in the face of Mexican government protests that she had no criminal record and the action thus violated U.S. norms for deportation.
  • Deportation of a young man who was under the protection of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and detention of another DACA-holding young man.
  • Arrest of a young undocumented woman who spoke out publicly about the raids that picked up her father and brother.

Some have wondered whether the media is highlighting the most dramatic cases and fomenting fear, The Washington Post ran the numbers, however, and found that arrests of noncriminal undocumented persons have doubled under Trump.

Undocumented parents of U.S. citizen children would do well to at least discuss what their emergency plan is and, as the Nolo article explains, “make specific arrangements to ensure their children will be cared for in the event of deportation.”