About: Ilona Bray

Ilona Bray is a former attorney and the author of several Nolo immigration books. Her working background includes both solo immigration practice and working or volunteering as an immigration attorney with nonprofit organizations in Seattle and California.

Recent Posts by Ilona Bray

New Edition of “Effective Fundraising for Nonprofits” Hits the Shelves!

effn5_1_1Nolo’s all-around guide to raising money for small to mid-size charitable organization has been a success since it was first published, not only becoming a resource for not nonprofit staff, but used at many universities to teach fundraising principles.

We’re please to announce that the book has just been released in its fifth edition.

Like every Nolo book, we take pains to update and freshen it up before issuing a new version. This latest one features:

  • Detailed new advice on running a crowdfunding campaign, including how to choose the best crowdfunding platform.
  • New stories from fundraising experts, such as Ligia Peña’s description of how to hold a donor-appreciation event, and John McArdle’s discussion of how to take donors’ personalities and wishes into account when crafting appeals.
  • New sample letters and marketing materials.

Check it out, along with Nolo’s other publications on starting and running nonprofit organizations.

Adult Kid Living at Home? You’re Not Alone, And It’s Not Forever

Paper house attached to yellow blank price tag on blue background

Pricey rental markets, low housing inventory and high home costs, crushing student debt loads, and difficulty finding jobs are adding up to an unmistakable U.S. trend: kids moving back in with mom and dad after graduating from a college or university.

If you live in New Jersey, Connecticut, New York, Florida, or California, the odds of having a child living at home are especially high, according to an August 18, 2016 analysis from Stateline.

Feel better now that you know it’s not just your kid? Great. But if you’re still hoping that the situation doesn’t last forever, you might want to point junior to a couple of Nolo’s free online articles:

Oops, yes, that latter one means your son or daughter may be coming to you requesting help with the down payment or more. But you wouldn’t be alone in that, either–it’s the only way that many young people today can afford to break into the real estate market.

If providing such help is financially impossible, here’s another prospect for you to consider: Do I Need a Building Permit to Construct a Tiny House in My Backyard? It could be a way to put some space between you and your returnee!

Yes, Home Seller, You Should Mention the Snakes!

snakeSometimes the law and ethics match up nicely, other times, not so much. That’s one of the reasons “The Ethicist” column in The New York Times can be both an entertaining and a frustrating read.

A recent column, “You’re Going to Sell Your Home. Should You Mention the Snakes?” provides an example of when the law and ethics line do match up; yet it reflects a total lack of awareness on the questioner’s part that the matter at hand is primarily a legal one.

The basic situation is that the prospective home sellers live in an area with a “snake problem.” About three times a year, they encounter poisonous copperheads, and have been bitten. They worry that if they reveal the snake issue to prospective home buyers, said buyers will go running in another direction.

The Ethicist basically advised speaking up. Otherwise, he explained, the homeowners will have to live with their conscience if the home’s new owners get bitten; and by speaking up, the sellers can help prepare the new owners to avoid snake contact, and thus minimize the risks. Sensible advice.

The Ethicist also got it right when he said, “Your lawyer or real estate agent would be able to tell you whether you have a legal duty in your state to reveal the facts that you have told me.”

But The Ethicist veered a little off course with the statement that, “Scruples like yours help explain why real estate agents don’t like to have the sellers around when they bring in prospective buyers.” The fact of the matter is that, in most U.S. states, both home sellers AND their real estate agents have an obligation to be forthcoming with any known “material” facts that would affect the value or salability of the property.

Most states have created lengthy, detailed disclosure forms that home sellers, and in some cases their real estate agents as well, must fill out. These forms advise prospective buyers of everything from a leak in the roof to a refrigerator with a wiring problem to a crack in the foundation. Few of these forms actually mention snakes; but no matter, most of them have an “other” clause.

Not only that, but it’s often the real estate agent who explains to the home seller that, far from giving in to the urge to hide problems, being forthcoming is a way to inspire trust and to ease negotiations. The buyer is going to be a lot less inclined to close the deal if, while touring the property, he or she runs into a snake or hears about the problem from a neighbor.

Moreover, full and complete disclosures are an important way to avoid later lawsuits. Failing to provide them is its very own “cause of action” (basis upon which to sue) in many states.

That doesn’t mean there aren’t unscrupulous sellers out there. That keeps lawyers and judges busy, with ongoing lawsuits about what the sellers should have disclosed. But for any seller curious about his or her obligations, and wanting to avoid such lawsuits, a good starting point is Nolo’s state-by-state series of articles on what disclosures are legally required.

Check Out the Writing-Award Winners From the 2016 National Association of Real Estate Editors’ Conference!

The Annual National Association of Real Estate Editors (NAREE) Conference just concluded in New Orleans, bringing together real estate writers, journalists, and industry experts from around the United States.

As always, the announcements of NAREE’s 2015 journalism and book award winners were event highlights.

Here’s a sampler of the writings that caught the judges’ eyes:

  • Josh Salman, of the Sarasota Herald Tribune, discussed flaws in administration and oversight of the EB-5 investor visa program, which many non-citizens use as a way to get a U.S. green card, in many cases by buying into sometimes dubious real estate investments.
  • Ken Harney, Washington Post Writers Group, revealed “Why an agent might refuse to show a house (the low commission).”
  • Jonathan O’Connell of The Washington Post examined the idyllic plans to upgrade Washington for the 2024 Olympics, and explained why, even without having won, the effort could still transform the city.
  • Emilie Rusch, Denver Post, looked into how legalization of marijuana has gobbled up empty commercial real estate in Denver, Colorado.

sell1_1_1And Nolo picked up an award as well: The book “Selling Your House: Nolo’s Essential Guide,” by Ilona Bray won gold in the annual Robert Bruss competition, which recognizes excellence in books covering the field of real estate.

NAREE’s judges commented that the book is a “clear, thorough handbook on selling a house” and noted that the helpful tips serve as “good preparation for those who may not have been in the market for a while.”

Charity Navigator Eases Pressure on Nonprofits to Show Minimal Overhead

starsA back-end change to the rating system metrics used by a watchdog organization for nonprofits may not sound like a big deal, or make for snazzy headlines. But the recent announcement by Charity Navigator that it is “upgrading” the way it evaluates charities and ultimately decides how many “stars” each one merits (one a one to four scale) represents a huge change in attitude, and one that will hopefully trickle down through the entire philanthropic community.

The main change to which I’m referring is in the way Charity Navigator will evaluate a nonprofit’s so-called “administrative expenses” going forward.

Currently, only charities that can claim to have no overhead expenses at all can earn Charity Navigator’s top score for that particular measurement, or ten points. Unless yours is an entirely volunteer-run organization, or never has to actually ask donors for financial support or hire people to handle accounting, development, or other management, that’s almost impossible to achieve.

Under Charity Navigator’s newly announced system, a nonprofit can score ten points if it comes within a given range of overhead expenses, taking into account the type of organization.

It’s a change that seems infinitely more realistic. For years, commentators have noted that, while excessive overhead may mean that someone is lining his or her pockets, some level of overhead is a necessary part of simply running an organization. (What for-profit corporation exists without management?!)

A quote in The York Times sums it up nicely: Elizabeth A.M. Searing, assistant professor at the Rockefeller College of Public Affairs & Policy at the University of Albany and a member of the Charity Navigator task force, explains that the change will make it easier for charities to avoid having to “starve themselves” so as not to appear as if they are spending excessively on overhead.

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