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Tiger Woods Arrested on DUI Charges

On May 29, 2017, professional golfer Tiger Woods was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence (DUI). Police arrested Woods in Jupiter, Florida, just miles from his Jupiter Island home.

According to the arrest report, at about 2:00 a.m., police found Woods parked in his Mercedes on the side of the road, engine running. Woods was allegedly stopped in the right traffic lane, with the passenger side of his car partially blocking the bike lane. On the driver’s side of the car, police observed two flat tires and damaged rims. Police also noticed damage to the front and back bumpers. Woods’ brake lights were reportedly illuminated and his right turn signal flashing.

The officer who approached the vehicle said he found Woods asleep at the wheel. When the officer shined his flashlight into the car, Woods reportedly opened his eyes. The officer noted that Woods had slurred and speech and was slow to answer questions and provide his driver’s license, registration, and insurance. At some point, Woods allegedly told police he was coming from L.A. on his way to Orange County.

Woods completed several field sobriety tests (FSTs), including the three “standardized” FSTs. The standardized FSTs are roadside tests—the horizontal gaze nystagmus (HGN), walk and turn, and one-leg stand—that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has deemed reliable indicators of impairment. According to police, Woods had problems following officer instructions and performing the FSTs.

Woods denied drinking or illegal drug use but admitted he had taken prescription medications. The results of two breath tests confirmed that Woods had no alcohol in his system. Woods also provided a urine sample, which will presumably reveal what intoxicating substances may have been in his body. Media reports indicate the medications Woods was on may have included the painkiller Vicodin. In a statement issued after his arrest, Woods reiterated the incident didn’t involve alcohol but rather was the result of “an unexpected reaction to prescribed medications.” Woods explained: “I didn’t realize the mix of medications had affected me so strongly.”

So where does Woods stand legally?

Tiger was released from jail on his “own recognizance” several hours after his arrest and is due in court for his arraignment on July 5, 2017.

Woods will likely face DUI charges. Florida’s DUI laws cover drunk and drugged driving. A motorist can be convicted of a drug-related DUI for driving or being in “actual physical control” of a vehicle while under the influence of certain intoxicating chemicals or any controlled substance. A driver is considered “under the influence” if affected by the substances ingested “to the extent that the person’s normal faculties are impaired.” And being in “actual physical control” generally means the driver is in the vehicle and has the capability of operating it. (Fla. Stat. Ann. § 316.193 (2017).)

Let’s look at how the law might apply to the facts of Tiger’s case. Police didn’t see Woods driving. But he was arguably in actual physical control of his car because he was sitting in the driver’s seat with the car running. And there’s evidence of impairment: Woods apparently crashed his car, had slurred speech, and performed poorly on FSTs. However, as of yet, it’s unclear what substances Woods had in his system. To be convicted of DUI, the prosecution must show Wood’s impairment was the result of ingesting one of the substances specified in the DUI law. Unfortunately, perhaps, for Woods, the list of qualifying drugs and controlled substances is extensive and includes Vicodin—a medication Woods was allegedly taking.

If convicted of DUI, Woods faces up to six months in jail, $500 to $1,000 in fines, and a six-month to one-year license suspension. (Fla. Stat. Ann. § 316.193 (2017).)

(Read more about the consequences of a first-offense DUI in Florida.)

GOP Candidate Greg Gianforte Cited for Misdemeanor Assault on the Eve of Montana’s Special Election

On May 24, 2017, the Gallatin County Sheriff cited Republican congressional candidate Greg Gianforte with misdemeanor assault. (Read the press release.) The citation followed an incident at the GOP candidate’s campaign headquarters in Bozeman, Montana in which Gianforte allegedly attacked Guardian reporter Ben Jacobs. According to Jacobs, Gianforte “body slammed” him after becoming irritated by a question about the Republicans’ health care bill. A Fox News reporter who witnessed the episode said Gianforte grabbed Jacobs by the neck and slammed him to the grounds. Gianforte’s spokesperson issued a statement that portrayed Jacobs as the instigator of the scuffle.

(See the Guardian’s article about the alleged assault, which includes an audio recording of the incident.)

After conducting an investigation, the Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office concluded there was probable cause to believe Gianforte was guilty of misdemeanor assault. Gianforte must appear in court for the citation between now and June 7, 2017. If convicted, Gianforte faces up to six months in jail and/or a maximum $500 in fines. (Mont. Code Ann. § 45-5-201 (2017).)

Montana voters go to the polls today—May 25, 2017—to decide who will fill the House of Representatives seat left vacant by former Congressman Ryan Zinke’s appointment as U.S. Interior Secretary. It’s unclear how Gianforte’s last-minute run-in with the law might affect his chances of prevailing over Democratic candidate Rob Quist in the close special election contest.

Keep Your Eyes on the Road: 2017 Brings New Cellphone Restrictions for California Drivers

Existing California law restricts motorists from talking on a cellphone or texting while driving, except when using a device in voice-operated, hands-free mode. The current text messaging restriction applies to writing, sending, and reading texts on a cellphone or other wireless device while driving. The law doesn’t, however, address other uses of cellphones and wireless devices. So common smartphone and tablet features like internet browsers and GPS—which don’t involve text messaging—aren’t covered. (Cal. Veh. Code §§ 23123, 23123.5, 23124 (2016).)

Realizing the deficienciesroad-people-street-smartphone in the current law, the California Legislature passed legislation (Assembly Bill 1785, “A.B. 1785”) this past year to fill the gap. The new law will prohibit California motorists from “holding and operating” any cellphone or wireless device while driving. By using this broad wording, the Legislature presumably intended to restrict motorists from doing anything on their devices that could be a distraction. Several exceptions apply to the new rule, one of which permits drivers to turn on or off a mounted GPS, so long as it requires only one tap or swipe to do so. Manufacturer-installed systems that are embedded in the vehicle are also exempt. (Cal. Veh. Code § 23123.5 (version effective Jan. 1, 2017).)

(Read more about California’s distracted driving laws and the penalties for a violation.)

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