Christian Longo’s Plea: “After you execute me, please harvest my organs.”

Christian Longo is on Oregon’s death row, convicted of brutally murdering his wife and three small children.  A healthy man aged 37, Longo has made an interesting humanitarian proposal.  He will drop his appeal of the death sentence.  This will save the state a lot of money. He will also agree to donation of his healthy organs after he is executed.  Since Oregon has waiting lists of people desperate for organ transplants, Longo’s proposal could save many lives.

“Yes” to Longo’s proposal sounds like a no-brainer.  It sure would to me if I were in need of a transplant.  But Oregon and most states are totally opposed.  Jeffrey Orlowski, executive director of the non-profit Association of Organ Procurement Organizations, is worried about taking advantage of people like Longo: “As a country, we have a high ethical and moral standard that we shouldn’t do things to people no matter how disadvantaged they are.” What?  Our country’s high moral standards allow for executions, but not for organ donations?  Give me a break!

Undoubtedly practical problems exist when carrying out death row inmates’ wishes to become organ donors after death.  But moral and ethical problems?  Much better to find a way to provide for “Oregon” transplants!