How Obamacare Will Affect Social Security and People With Disabilities

One way that Obama’s health care reform will help make health insurance accessible to more people is by eliminating preexisting condition exclusions.  This will be a big benefit to those with disabilities, because many will now be able to purchase their own insurance. Having more people eligible for private health insurance will have an effect on Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid.

Thanks to Obama’s health care reform law, as of January 1, 2014, insurance companies can no longer deny coverage to individuals with preexisting conditions, or charge them higher rates. (See Nolo’s recent article on the ban against preexisting condition limitations.) At the same time, individuals without group health insurance can purchase insurance through the Health Insurance Marketplace; applications can be submitted starting October 1, 2013. Those with low income (less than 400% of the federal poverty level) are eligible for lower premiums, and those with even lower income (250% of the federal poverty level) can qualify for lower out-of-pocket costs like deductibles and copays. (See Nolo’s federal poverty guidelines for exact figures.)

These two provisions of the new health care reform law (called the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010) should lower the number of people on Medicare and Social Security disability.  Why? Historically, many folks with preexisting conditions who lost their prior work-based health coverage apply for disability benefits just so they can get health care benefits. They know that an approval for Social Security disability will mean they can either qualify early for Medicare, or, if they have very low income (or somewhat low income and very high medical expenses), they may be eligible for Medicaid. Some of these folks will now decide not to file for disability benefits since they don’t need a disability approval to get health care, now that insurance companies can’t turn down people with disabling medical conditions and disabled individuals have an opportunity to buy affordable health care, more flexibility in choosing a health care plan, and the potential for out-of-pocket savings on their health care needs.

Not only that, but now that more persons with disabilities or chronic medical conditions will have good health care and access to reasonable priced medications, more of them will be able to work despite having physical or mental impairments, and fewer of them will need to apply for disability benefits.

What’s more, those who can’t work for a while due to a temporary disability will be less likely to need to be off work indefinitely, thanks to better health care and access to medications. In fact, fewer people many now qualify for Social Security disability since only those whose medical conditions prevent them from working for at least 12 months are eligible for SSDI or SSI disability benefits. Now, some disability applicants who would have been eligible to receive Social Security while they recuperate from injuries or mental illnesses may recover sooner because of regular doctors’ visits plus the proper medication.

On the other hand, some other folks who would have previously been denied disability benefits or Medicaid benefits are now more likely to be approved. Often disability applicants are denied because they haven’t been seeing a doctor for treatment and don’t have test results to prove their disability. Now that health care is more accessible, more folks who apply for disability will have been seeing doctors regularly and have the proper diagnoses, lab results, and x-rays in their records. This should help eliminate the need for Social Security to send applicants to consultative medical exams and should reduce the number of disability appeals – with the proper medical records, fewer claims will be incorrectly denied disability benefits in the first place. This represents significant potential cost savings for Social Security.

Similarly, despite fewer people applying for disability benefits, Medicaid roles will increase, of course, because in some states Obamacare’s Medicaid expansion will now allow adults with incomes of up to 133%-138% of the federal poverty level to qualify for Medicaid.

But overall, health care reform appears to be a great deal for persons with disabilities.