Will moving back in with my wife cause her to lose SSI and Medicaid?

Question: I am on SSDI and my wife is on SSDI and a very small SSI check. We live apart but her health is getting worse and she really needs to live with me. I get $807 SSDI and have to pay my $29 for Medicare Part D out of that. She gets $703 SSDI after her Medicare D payment. I would actually be kind of a caregiver for her, as she falls down a lot from her strokes years ago. We are wondering if it would affect her income or Medicaid in any way. She has full Medicaid because of her small SSI check and I am on Medicaid crossover.

Answer: Your income would be counted toward your wife’s eligibility for SSI, and given your SSDI income, it’s not unlikely that she would lose her SSI and SSI-dependent Medicaid. But, if your state has opted into Medicaid expansion, your wife could continue to qualify for Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). (Under the ACA, those with incomes up to 138% of the federal poverty level can qualify for Medicaid in expansion states.)

Additionally, it sounds like your wife has been receiving Medicare. If she loses Medicaid, she could probably qualify to receive free Medicare Part B through the Specified Low-Income Medicare Beneficiary (SLMB) and Qualifying Individual (QI) programs and to receive “Extra Help paying for Medicare Part D.

Also, you should consider that your increased income from moving in together could affect your dual eligibility status  for Medicare and Medicaid. You could probably also get help through the above programs, but you may not continue to qualify as a Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB) for crossover purposes. This could mean you might be subject to more out-of-pocket costs. I would talk to Social Security about how the move would affect your wife’s SSI eligibility and to your state’s department of health care services about how the change would affect dual eligibility for you both.