If I move to a state that doesn’t recognize same-sex marriage, will I lose my Social Security benefits?

Question: I heard Social Security finally changed the rules regarding benefits for same-sex couples. If I was married in a recognition state in the Northeast and then I retire to Florida, a non-recognition state, will my Social Security spousal benefits be cut off?

Answer: It depends. If you were already receiving benefits before you moved, you should be okay. The Justice Department has clarified this week what happens if a married couple moves to a state that doesn’t recognize gay marriage. From now on, when a claimant applies for spousal benefits, the Social Security Administration will evaluate his or her eligibility based on the state in which she lives during the application process, and will not later reassess eligibility if the person moves. Here’s some background on how Social Security decides eligibility.

Whether a spouse is eligible for Social Security benefits on her spouse’s earnings record depends on whether the state in which the couple lives recognizes the couple’s marriage as valid. Despite a 2013 Supreme Court ruling that overturned part of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), a federal Social Security statute still says spouses are considered married when the state in which they live considers them married.

The states that now recognize same-sex spouses as legally married and eligible for Social Security dependent and survivors benefits are California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, and D.C.

So, for example, if you and your spouse are legally married in New York and you apply for Social Security benefits while living there, and then you move to Florida, a state that doesn’t recognize same-sex marriage, you will continue to receive benefits because you lived in New York when you applied for benefits. This is a bit quirky, because it also means that, if you marry in New York, live there for a while, then move to Florida, and then apply for Social Security benefits, you will be ineligible, because at the time of application you lived in a non-recognition state. Confusing, but that’s the way current law stands.

For more information on the benefits available, see Nolo’s articles on Social Security dependents benefits and Social Security survivors benefits.