Why can’t I get emergency disability payments from Social Security?

Question: Why would Social Security Administration put information on their site about emergency payments if they’re not actually available? My lawyer says I can’t get them and I shouldn’t read this stuff. I suffer from major depression, carpel tunnel, and polyarthritis among other health issues. I’ve been waiting eight months waiting for a disability hearing date.

I am being foreclosed on and I don’t even have a hearing date yet, to negotiate me being allowed to make modified payments to the mortgage company. I was also not approved for a dire need situation even though SSA was sent a foreclosure proceedings letter from the mortgage company. All this just makes the major depression worse, now dealing with homelessness with 3 children.

Answer: I’m so sorry to hear of your struggles. Unfortunately Social Security makes emergency payments to disability applicants only under some very specific circumstances. First, only SSI applicants who are experiencing extreme hardship qualify for emergency payments. If you qualify only for Social Security disability insurance (SSDI) benefits, you can’t receive emergency payments. But it sounds like your income is low and you’ve exhausted your assets, so you will like qualify for SSI.

Second, only those who qualify for presumptive disability benefits are eligible for emergency payments. Presumptive disability benefits are available only for a few specific disabilities that are so severe that Social Security can almost assume you’ll qualify for disability benefits, based on your initial Social Security interview or application alone.

Some illnesses or conditions that often qualify for presumptive disability payments are AIDs, ALS, Down syndrome, amputation of the leg at the hip, total blindness, total deafness, stroke, and severe intellectual disability. Depression, arthritis, and carpel tunnel syndrome, even in combination, will not qualify for presumptive disability payments or emergency payments, though it never hurts to ask when you first apply. Likewise with a dire need letter, which can be helpful in moving up a hearing date, though dire need letters seldom work, as you saw yourself.

Most states do offer interim assistance for disability applicants for those who meet public assistance criteria and are severely disabled. Read more about this in Nolo’s article on state interim assistance and other government assistance.

It sounds like your lawyer didn’t want to explain why you wouldn’t qualify for emergency payments and isn’t interested in helping you learn about disability benefits on your own – or at the least, doesn’t want you to misunderstand information put out by Social Security. If you want an easy-to-understand guide to disability benefits, see if your library has Nolo’s Guide to Social Security Disability, which explains the ins and outs of the process.