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We’ve moved!

Nolo’s Disability Blog has moved and now resides on our partner site, disabilitysecrets.com. I will still be answering readers’ disability questions, occasionally joined by guest blogging disability attorneys from around the country. Please visit us on the “Ask Your Disability Question” page on disability secrets.com, where you can find our entire archive of past questions and answers.

COLA Increases Social Security in 2015

Social Security has announced that there will be a 1.7% increase in Social Security and SSI benefits for 2015. This is just a bit higher than the cost of living adjustment (COLA) in 2014, which was 1.5%. Along with this increase in benefits, many important Social Security limits and Medicare fees will change on January 1, 2015.

The average Social Security retirement and disability benefit is expected to increase to $1,328, the average disability benefit to $1,165, and the average surviving spouse benefit to $1,274. The most Social Security benefits a retiree can collect in 2015 will be $2,663 per month (but most people collect less than this).

If you continue to work while collecting early Social Security retirement benefits, your benefits will be reduced by $1 for every $2 you make over $1,310 per month. But if you will turn 66 during 2015, you can make up to $3,490 per month before your benefits are reduced (there is no limit once you turn 66).

The maximum amount of your income that is subject to the Social Security tax to fund Social Security retirement, survivors, and dependents benefits, as well as Social Security disability insurance, is $118,500 in 2015. There is no limit to the amount of income subject to the Medicare tax.

As to SSI, the new federal SSI benefit rate is $733 per month for an individual and $1,100 per month for a couple. The SSI payment amounts are higher in states that pay a supplementary SSI payment. Although some states have higher limits, in states without a supplementary payment, if you have income between $733 and $1,551, your SSI payment will be reduced, and over $1,551, your SSI will be terminated.

As far as determining your initial eligibility for disability purposes, in 2015 you must be making less than $1,090 per month to qualify for benefits, or $1,820 if you are blind. If you receive SSDI and are trying to go back to work, if you make more than $780 per month, it will count as one of your nine trial work months.

Note there is no increase in the Medicare Part B premiums and deductibles for 2015. However, there are some increases in the Part A and D deductibles. See Nolo’s 2015 update on Medicare for the details.

Shoring Up Social Security to Save the Trust Fund

The McCrery-Pomeroy SSDI Solutions Initiative, a project chaired by former congressmen Jim McCrery (R-LA) and Earl Pomeroy (D-ND) and funded by the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, has put out a call for innovative proposals to improve the Social Security Disability insurance (SSDI) program to prevent insolvency and provide long-term financial stability. Topics the initiative is calling for paper proposals on include the following:

  • Improving the Disability Determination Process
  • Modernizing Determination Criteria and Program Eligibility
  • Strengthening Program Integrity and Management
  • Improving Incentives and Support for Beneficiaries to Return to Work
  • Encouraging Disabled Workers to Remain in the Workforce
  • Improving SSDI Program Interaction with Other Federal, State, Local, and/or Private Programs
  • Moving beyond the Current “All or Nothing” System of Awarding Benefits
  • Encouraging Employers to Support Disabled Workers

I was surprised not to see any fiscal solutions on the list, such as raising the cap on Social Security (FICA) taxes, which currently taxes only the first $117,000 of a taxpayer’s income, at 6.2%. Income above this cap is not taxed for Social Security purposes. But perhaps this idea, which has been around for a long time, is too simple for the purposes of this initiative and not considered innovative enough. More details on proposal topics can be found here: http://ssdisolutions.org/call-papers. Proposals are due by November 1.

For those who want to read an overview on the future of Social Security, including why things aren’t quite as dire as they sound, read Nolo’s article on whether Social Security benefits will be there when you retire.

New Social Security Figures Released for 2014

Yesterday Social Security announced that there would be a 1.5% increase in Social Security and SSI benefits for 2014. This is smaller than most retirees and disabled recipients would have liked, but remember that in 2010 and 2011, there was no increase.

Along with this increase in benefits, many important Social Security limits and Medicare fees will change on January 1, 2014.

The average Social Security retirement and disability benefit is expected to increase to $1,294, the average disability benefit to $1,148, and the average surviving spouse benefit to $1,243. The most Social Security benefits a retiree can collect in 2014 will be $2,642 per month.

If you continue to work while collecting early Social Security retirement benefits, your benefits will be reduced by $1 for every $2 you make over $1,290 per month. But if you will turn 66 during 2014, you can make up to $3,450 per month before your benefits are reduced (there is no limit once you turn 66).

The maximum amount of your income that is subject to the Social Security tax to fund Social Security retirement, survivors, and dependents benefits, as well as Social Security disability insurance, is $117,000 in 2014. There is no limit to the amount of income subject to the Medicare tax.

As to SSI, the new federal SSI benefit rate is $721 per month for an individual and $1,082 per month for a couple. The SSI payment amounts are higher in states that pay a supplementary SSI payment. Although some states have higher limits, in states with=out a supplementary payment, if you have income between $721 and $1,527, your SSI payment will be reduced, and over $1,527, your SSI will be terminated.

As far as determining your initial eligibility for disability purposes, in 2014 you must be making less than $1,070 per month to qualify for benefits, or $1,800 if you are blind. If you receive SSDI and are trying to go back to work, if you make more than $770 per month, it will count as one of your nine trial work months.

How Obamacare Will Affect Social Security and People With Disabilities

One way that Obama’s health care reform will help make health insurance accessible to more people is by eliminating preexisting condition exclusions.  This will be a big benefit to those with disabilities, because many will now be able to purchase their own insurance. Having more people eligible for private health insurance will have an effect on Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid.

Thanks to Obama’s health care reform law, as of January 1, 2014, insurance companies can no longer deny coverage to individuals with preexisting conditions, or charge them higher rates. (See Nolo’s recent article on the ban against preexisting condition limitations.) At the same time, individuals without group health insurance can purchase insurance through the Health Insurance Marketplace; applications can be submitted starting October 1, 2013. Those with low income (less than 400% of the federal poverty level) are eligible for lower premiums, and those with even lower income (250% of the federal poverty level) can qualify for lower out-of-pocket costs like deductibles and copays. (See Nolo’s federal poverty guidelines for exact figures.)

These two provisions of the new health care reform law (called the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010) should lower the number of people on Medicare and Social Security disability.  Why? Historically, many folks with preexisting conditions who lost their prior work-based health coverage apply for disability benefits just so they can get health care benefits. They know that an approval for Social Security disability will mean they can either qualify early for Medicare, or, if they have very low income (or somewhat low income and very high medical expenses), they may be eligible for Medicaid. Some of these folks will now decide not to file for disability benefits since they don’t need a disability approval to get health care, now that insurance companies can’t turn down people with disabling medical conditions and disabled individuals have an opportunity to buy affordable health care, more flexibility in choosing a health care plan, and the potential for out-of-pocket savings on their health care needs.

Not only that, but now that more persons with disabilities or chronic medical conditions will have good health care and access to reasonable priced medications, more of them will be able to work despite having physical or mental impairments, and fewer of them will need to apply for disability benefits.

What’s more, those who can’t work for a while due to a temporary disability will be less likely to need to be off work indefinitely, thanks to better health care and access to medications. In fact, fewer people many now qualify for Social Security disability since only those whose medical conditions prevent them from working for at least 12 months are eligible for SSDI or SSI disability benefits. Now, some disability applicants who would have been eligible to receive Social Security while they recuperate from injuries or mental illnesses may recover sooner because of regular doctors’ visits plus the proper medication.

On the other hand, some other folks who would have previously been denied disability benefits or Medicaid benefits are now more likely to be approved. Often disability applicants are denied because they haven’t been seeing a doctor for treatment and don’t have test results to prove their disability. Now that health care is more accessible, more folks who apply for disability will have been seeing doctors regularly and have the proper diagnoses, lab results, and x-rays in their records. This should help eliminate the need for Social Security to send applicants to consultative medical exams and should reduce the number of disability appeals – with the proper medical records, fewer claims will be incorrectly denied disability benefits in the first place. This represents significant potential cost savings for Social Security.

Similarly, despite fewer people applying for disability benefits, Medicaid roles will increase, of course, because in some states Obamacare’s Medicaid expansion will now allow adults with incomes of up to 133%-138% of the federal poverty level to qualify for Medicaid.

But overall, health care reform appears to be a great deal for persons with disabilities.

Welcome to Nolo’s Disability Blog

Welcome to the latest addition to Nolo’s legal blogs: the Disability Blog. I’ll be blogging mostly about Social Security disability and SSI, with some information on veterans benefits, Medicare, Medicaid, and workers’ compensation thrown in from time to time. Send me your question about disability, and if it hasn’t already been answered on our site, I’ll answer it. Please don’t send questions that you don’t want published, and know that we can’t guarantee an answer to all questions. Ask a question.