Wage and Hour Violations at Restaurants

A couple of days ago, the New York Times published an article about wage and hour violations at Urasawa, a very trendy — and expensive — sushi restaurant in Beverly Hills. According to the article, workers were not paid overtime and not allowed to take legally required breaks. An employee interviewed for the article also noted that he was required to buy his own $700 set of knives, at a time when he was earning between $9 and $11 an hour. (Although the article didn’t mention it, this is a separate violation of California law, which requires employers to bear the cost of uniforms, tools, and other items necessary for employees to do their jobs.)

Restaurants are too frequently in violation of wage and hour laws, from overtime and break rules to minimum wage, uniform, and tip requirements. If the violator is extremely upscale, like the restaurant cited in the Times article, employees are often willing to put up with substandard conditions in exchange for the opportunity to gain the experience and cachet that stem from working at a trendy spot. (Apparently, diners are also willing to put up with a lot to eat there, from a $1,000 price tag for dinner for two to rules about how the food must be treated that would make Sienfeld’s Soup Nazi blush.) At the other end of the spectrum, employees working at fast-food franchises and low-budget eateries often don’t know their rights and work for an owner who is operating on a financial shoestring.

In recent years, the Department of Labor has taken steps to remedy this situation, from revising the regulations on tip credits to partnering with the Subway restaurant chain to make sure that employees know their rights. Let’s hope it works! Because I don’t know about you, but for my own selfish reasons, I’d prefer to have my food prepared by workers who are allowed to go to the bathroom when they need to.