Senate May Finally Pass ENDA

prideflagToday, the Senate is expected to take up the Employment Nondiscrimination Act, known informally as ENDA. This bill would outlaw workplace discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity, by adding those protected traits to Title VII.

Wikipedia tells us that the first Congressional effort to prohibit job discrimination against gay men and lesbians happened in 1974; In many Congressional sessions since, some version of ENDA has been introduced and gone nowhere. The House of Representatives managed to pass a version of the law in 2007, but the cost of passage was high for some: The version that finally passed had no protections based on gender identity. And no version of ENDA has ever passed the Senate.

This week, vote counters believe that will all change. According to New York Times reporting on the Senate vote, all 55 democratic senators are expected to vote for the bill, four more Republicans are on board, and only one more vote is required to invoke cloture (end the debate) and hold an up-or-down vote. When you consider that one of the official undecideds is Rob Portman, who announced his support for gay marriage because his son is gay, chances for passage look pretty good. (And in the nontraditional marriage department, Cindy McCain apparently sent her husband, Senator John McCain, a postcard urging him to vote for the bill; this prompted a strained formal response from the Senator’s office that he “enjoys and appreciates having discussions on the important issues of the day with all the members of his family.”)

What will happen in the House is anybody’s guess. But there are signs of trouble for opponents of the bill, who are having to reach deep into their bag of tricks to articulate reasons to oppose the law. Members of Congress told the Times that they are having to respond to arguments that the law would unfairly force Christian bookstores to hire drag performers and require schools to allow male teachers to wear dresses in the classroom. (A brief aside: What kid would not love this?) When the counterarguments reach this level, you know momentum in favor of the bill has reached critical mass.