Will Emergency Unemployment Compensation Benefits Expire?

unemployedThere was a sobering article in the New York Times this morning, “Extension of Benefits for Jobless Set to End.” Since the economy tanked in 2008, the federal government has made additional unemployment benefits available through the Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) program. This program supplements the benefits available in each state to provide additional weeks of compensation.

Today, most states provide a maximum of 26 weeks of unemployment benefits to those who lose their jobs through no fault of their own. (A few states — including Florida, Georgia, and North Carolina — have cut back and offer fewer than 26 weeks.) A permanent federal program, in place since 1970, offers extended benefits in states where the unemployment rate is both high and increasing. Although a number of states still have relatively high unemployment rates, those rates have been high for a while now. As a result, these states don’t have increasing unemployment rates. Therefore, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP), no state currently provides benefits under the extended benefit program.

That leaves the EUC program as the only source of extended benefits for the long-term unemployed. The EUC program offers 14 to 47 additional weeks of benefits. (The number of weeks depends on the state’s unemployment rate; there’s an up-to-date chart of each state’s benefit offerings at “How Many Weeks of Unemployment Compensation Are Available?” at the CBPP’s website.) However, the entire EUC program is set to expire at the end of the year.

Congress has had to vote on this program a number of times in the past five years, and each time it has extended the program. As you may recall, however, this has been a particularly rough year for partisan fights over government funding. Congress still has to come up with a budget, as it agreed to do in ending the shutdown. As a result, the Times predicts that Congress is unlikely to continue the EUC program past the end of the year, with the result that 1.3 million people will immediately lose access to these additional benefits.