gavelOne New York employer thought it had a bright idea: Lay off an employee who is called to serve on a jury, allow her to collect unemployment, then decide, once the trial is over, whether to offer her job back. That’s how the New York Times described an employer’s response when its employee gave notice that she had been selected to serve on a jury in a criminal case against Osama Bin Laden’s son-in-law (“Juror Loses Job for Serving in Terror Trial“).

Apparently it wasn’t bad enough to be called for jury duty, then actually selected for a case that will undoubtedly be lengthy and difficult, then apparently told that the trial is so “sensitive” that all jurors will be referred to only as numbers. No, poor Juror 21 had to suffer the additional indignity of hearing from her employer that she would be paid for only three days, then demoted, and finally laid off.

The judge in the case pointed out that this violates federal law, and it does. It’s a federal case, so perhaps the judge can be forgiven for not pointing out that it violates New York law as well. Most states prohibit employers from coercing an employee to avoid jury duty, or from disciplining or firing employees called to serve. (See Taking Time Off for Jury Duty for a list of every state’s rules.)

So far, so good. But the real problem is getting paid. Only a few states require employers to pay their employees for the time they spend serving on a jury. State laws may provide for nominal juror fees paid by the court, but these amounts are quite small. In fact, Juror 21’s employer offered more than New York law requires. Although state law requires employers to pay for three days (only) of service, the amount they have to pay is capped at the princely sum of 40 bucks a day.

The judge has appointed a lawyer to represent Juror 21 in contacting her employer and trying to work things out.