Tag Archives: minimum wage

Will Congress Change the Tip Credit?

waiterThe federal minimum wage law has a special exception for servers, bartenders, and other employees who receive tips: These tipped employees can be paid much less than the minimum wage per hour (in most states), as long as they earn enough in tips to bring their hourly total up to at least the full minimum. Right now, the federal minimum wage is $7.25 an hour. But federal law allows employers to pay tipped employees as little as $2.13 an hour!

This practice of paying tipped employees less is called taking a “tip credit,” meaning the employer gets to credit part of the employee’s tips against its minimum wage obligation. Not all states allow a tip credit: California, for example, requires employers to pay tipped employees the full state minimum wage. And some states allow a lower tip credit, requiring employers to pay more per hour than federal law would mandate. (The more protective law governs in wage and hour matters.)

That measly $2.13 took effect back when the minimum wage was $4.25 an hour. In other words, the tip credit was supposed to be half of the minimum wage. But as the minimum wage increased, the wage for tipped employees stayed the same, part of a compromise to get the wage hikes passed. Now, Congress is contemplating raising both the minimum wage and the amount tipped employees must be paid. According to an article in today’s New York Times (“Proposal to Raise Tip Wages Resisted“), Senator Tom Harkin has introduced a bill that would raise the minimum wage to $10.10 and the tipped employee wage by 95 cents per year until it reaches $7.10. Further increases would be tied to inflation.

As is perhaps evident from the title of the article, this proposal is facing plenty of pushback, primarily from restaurant owners. And of course, it’s unclear how Congress would agree on a minimum wage and tipped employees wage increase when they can’t pass a farm bill or extend unemployment benefits. But at least this problem has hit the radar of the U.S. Senate and the nation’s paper of record.

Want to know more about your state’s law on tips, including tip credits, tip pooling, and who gets to keep those mandatory service charges the house tacks on to the bill? We’ve got a set of articles — one for each state and the District of Columbia — on this very topic; select your state from the list at State Laws for Tipped Employees.

State Minimum Wage Increases for 2014

Last week, California Governor Jerry Brown signed a bill that will increase the state’s minimum wage to $9 on July 1, 2014, and $10 at the beginning of 2016. (The state’s current minimum wage is $8.) So far, three other states have passed minimum wage increases that will take effect in 2014: Connecticut’s wage will increase to $8.70 for 2014, then $9 for 2015; New York’s wage will increase to $8 at the end of this year, then $8.75 at the end of 2014, then $9 at the end of 2015; and Rhode Island’s minimum will hit $8 at the beginning of 2014. (Nolo has minimum wage information for all 50 states and the District of Columbia at our Wage & Hour page.)

The federal minimum wage, currently $7.25 an hour, is now lower than the minimum wage in more than a third of the states. About half of the states have the same minimum wage as the federal government, and a handful of states either have a lower minimum wage or have no minimum wage at all. As a practical matter, this final group of states also uses the federal minimum wage. The federal wage rate is a floor, not a ceiling. States are free to adopt a higher minimum wage, and employers within the state must pay the higher rate. But in states with a lower minimum wage, employers must generally comply with the federal law unless they are so small and local as to not be subject to the Fair Labor Standards Act.

States generally adopt higher minimum wage rates to try to bring wages into line with the cost of living. But, according to the Center for Poverty Research at U.C. Davis, the federal minimum wage is not cutting the mustard. A full-time employee who works 40 hours a week for a full year, without taking a single unpaid day off, earns about $15,000 annually, just a few thousand dollars above the poverty level for a single person (and well below the poverty level for a family with one or more children).

President Obama has called for an increase in the federal minimum wage to $9; he also appointed a Secretary of Labor, Thomas Perez, who supports raising the minimum wage. However, based on the current climate in Congress (which today is on the verge of shutting the government down), it doesn’t seem likely that a federal wage increase will happen any time soon. And that means the real action will remain at the state and local level.

Take This Internship and . . . Pay For It

blackswaneditLast week, two unpaid interns who worked on the film “Black Swan” won a lawsuit against Fox Searchlight Pictures. The interns claimed that they should have been paid for their work, which included such important cinematic tasks as taking out the garbage, ordering lunch, booking flights for their bosses, and assembling office furniture. The judge for the federal District Court in Manhattan agreed, finding that the two interns were treated as employees and were, therefore, entitled to compensation for their time.

These days, internships are an increasingly popular option, especially for students and recent graduates who can’t find paid work in their fields. CNN Money recently reported an 8.8% unemployment rate — and an almost 19% “underemployment” rate — among recent college grads, both rates still higher than before the economic downturn began. Many young people are willing (or desperate enough) to work without pay to get their foot in the door of their chosen profession. Of course, they’d rather get paid. But if the only way to break into a field is by doing grunt work day and night without pay, some people will take that deal.

This is where the law steps in to set some boundaries. Employment law pushes back against the metric of “whatever the market will bear” to require employers to pay at least the minimum wage, to protect employees from unsafe working conditions, and to prohibit harassment, for example — even if plenty of employees might tolerate mistreatment and subsistence wages just to get and keep a job. That desperate job seekers are willing to put up with almost anything in exchange for work doesn’t mean it’s legal.

That’s what Fox learned last week, and what employers in other popular industries are starting to understand. According to an article about the case in the New York Times, similar lawsuits have been filed against television, modeling, and fashion magazine employers, claiming interns should have been paid. Employers in these sexy fields have been some of the worst offenders in not paying interns, presumably because so many people are desperate to work in film and fashion.

There’s nothing shocking about desperate job seekers or employers willing to exploit them, sadly. There’s nothing surprising about the outcome of the case, either. The law about unpaid internships is very clear. Employers may hire people to work without pay only if the job meets a strict six-part test, including that the job must benefit the intern, must not provide the employer with an immediate advantage, must be closely supervised, and must not be a required stepping stone to a paid position. (You can find details on the six factors in Am I really an intern or just an employee who isn’t getting paid?) But Fox argued that the judge should forget the factors and instead simply weigh whether the intern or the employer gained more from the arrangement. If the intern benefitted more, then it’s a legal internship. The judge was not impressed by this argument, nor by the college credits offered for some internships, nor by the fact that the interns who sued undoubtedly did learn some things about the film industry during their unpaid time at Fox.

All beside the point, as the judge made clear. The six-part test is strict for a reason: Internships are a somewhat disruptive exception to the usual workplace exchange of labor for money. As such, they are intended to be rare.

 

President Obama’s Proposed Minimum Wage Increase

In last week’s State of the Union address, President Obama spoke of many things. Not shoes and ships and sealing wax, but immigration reform, proposals to stop gun violence, climate change, and energy policy. The proposal that seemed to get the most press afterwards, however, was his call to raise the minimum wage to $9 (from the current rate of $7.25 an hour) and tie further increases to the cost of living.

Perhaps one reason this got the most press is that it’s so concise. Unlike, for example, immigration reform or steps to halt climate change, raising the minimum wage is simple and straightforward. The details of the proposal are clear. No comprehensive plan is necessary, and there aren’t a lot of moving parts. Of course, that doesn’t mean the proposal is without controversy. The Chamber of Commerce has long opposed increases in the minimum wage, and other business groups have come out against any increases.

What would be the practical effect of the President’s proposal? Currently, 19 states and the District of Columbia require employers to pay a higher minimum wage than the federal rate of $7.25 an hour. As of today, however, only one state — Washington — has a minimum wage of at least $9. As a practical matter, this means wages would go up in virtually every state if the rate were raised all at once. (Except in cities that have their own higher minimum wages. In San Francisco, for example, employers must pay at least $10.55 an hour; where I work, in Berkeley, vendors with the city must pay at least $13.03 an hour with medical benefits, or $15.20 an hour without.)