storkManagers, do you enjoy giving employee evaluations? Many managers ¬†don’t: They find it difficult to give constructive criticism, fit employee accomplishments and areas for improvements into their company’s evaluation form, or make time to sort back through their documentation for the year, complete the form, and meet with employees about it. But imagine how you would feel if the company’s evaluation form also included questions about the employee’s “maternity plans.” And then you had to use that information to help generate a “maternity projection chart,” purporting to calculate the likelihood that a particular female employee would have a child soon based on her age, marital status, and maternal status.

According to a complaint filed in a federal district court in New York, that’s what happened at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition. (Hat tip to the Employment Law Daily; they have also posted a copy of the court’s decision in favor of the employees.) The employees alleged not only that the chart was created, and that it included information only on female employees, but also that the employer used it in making employment decisions.

This is one of the stranger allegations in the case, but by no means the only allegations the employees made about discrimination, retaliation, and violation of FMLA rights at the Institute. Each of the named plaintiffs (they are bringing a class action) had quite a tale to tell, including comments by the company’s owner that “women’s priorities shift when they become mothers,” that one expecting employee should speak to her partner about whether it was “worth it,” because he “had never met a new mom that didn’t underestimate the sleep, time, exhaustion from a new baby,” and that he wouldn’t consider another woman for a promotion because she was “getting married, and her head was in another place.” Once they revealed their pregnancies or went out on leave, the women claimed that they faced different treatment, demotion, and ultimately discharge.

No judge or jury has determined whether these allegations are correct, because the case came up on a motion to dismiss. In other words, the employer was arguing that some of the employees’ claims were so weak that it should not even have to respond to them, right out of the gates. In fairness, the court tossed one allegation by one employee. (Her retaliation claim was thrown out because she didn’t allege that she had complained of discrimination before being mistreated.) ¬†Otherwise, though, the employees won. Based on the allegations, it’s no surprise. What surprised me is that the employer found it worth arguing about, given the strength of the allegations.