A couple of weeks ago, Cisco released its second annual Cisco Connected World Technology Report — and the findings were truly eye-opening. (Here’s Cisco’s press release, which includes the highlights; they were also featured in the news article “Millenials Put Tech Freedom Before Salary.”) For the report, Cisco surveyed more than 2,800 college students and young professionals in 14 countries — the so-called “millenials” or Generation Z. Given the generally crummy state of the economy, I thought those who were looking for jobs (or soon to be ) would list their primary concerns as, well, just whether they’d be able to find work, along with salary, salary, and salary. (As in, is it enough to get my own place, or will I be living with my parents until the end of time?)

But no. According to this survey, it’s all about social networking, portable electronic devices, and working from home or other remote locations. Here are a few choice bits:

  • More than half said that if their company banned access to social media sites from work, they would either turn down a job offer or find a way to get around the prohibition.
  • 40% of college students — and 45% of young professionals — said they would accept lower paying work if it offered more flexibility regarding social media access, mobility, and device choice.
  • About 70% said they should be allowed to access personal sites and social media sites using company-owned devices.
  • About 30% said they should have the “right” to work remotely once they get work; 70% believe it unnecessary to be in the office regularly, as long as they show up for important meetings (I’m with them on that).

What to make of these findings? On the one hand, it gives employers a blueprint for attracting the best applicants of the youngest working generation: Let them work remotely, access social media sites from work, choose their mobile devices, and use your equipment for personal as well as business reasons. On the other hand, there are some fairly sound arguments to be made for having rules in place that separate business from personal, at least in electronic devices. Want to be liable for employee overtime you didn’t even know about? Let employees do work using their personal electronic devices. Interested in exposing yourself to personal injury lawsuits? Let employees use their company-issued smart phones for personal calls and texts, then wait for them to do it while driving. Sexual harassment lawsuits more your thing? Encourage managers to friend employees on Facebook, then wait for the nude pics to show up. The truth is that unless and until the legal climate changes to accommodate the blurring of personal and professional lives that younger generations embrace, it might be tough to offer the types of electronic freedom these future workers of the world want.