Leaving Gold Coins, Jewelery, and other tangible personal property

Dear Liza: I collect estate jewelry, and ancient and antique coins.  As I am inventorying my belongings to determine what should be left to whom, I wonder if this all needs to be spelled out in the document, or if I can maintain an inventory spreadsheet with pictures of the items.  Or would I need to go ahead and spell out every single item in the will itself, updating the will every year or two? So, estate jewelry, and coins, and the like are what’s called “tangible personal property” in estate planning. These are items that you own, but that don’t have a title document (like a deed, or a pink slip). Often, a Will will leave all such tangibles to a spouse or to children. Sometimes, a Will will say that the testator (that’s the person making the Will) may leave a separate, signed list, with gifts to specific people of specific objects. That might work best for you. That way, you can update that list periodically, without the expense of having to update your Will. If your collection is really valuable, you might want to transfer it to a living trust, to avoid a probate proceeding upon your death–but that’s pretty unusual and only appropriate if the value of those tangible items are high, such as with a Steinway piano, or vauable jewelery.