Lifetime Gifts

Dear Liza: My friend has a stock portfolio she wants to give me before she dies.  She had cancer and only has a few months to live.  She wants to give it to me now to avoid the whole estate thing.  The total is about $220,000.  Do I have to pay gift tax if she transfers the portfolio to me in kind?  I am sorry to hear that your friend is so ill.  She can give you that portfolio, but it might not be the most tax-effective way to do it.  If she gives you the portfolio before she dies, she (or her estate) must report the gift on a gift tax return by April 15th of the following year. She won’t owe any gift tax on the transfer, because in 2012, each of us can give up to $5.12 million dollars free of gift tax, but any gift over the annual gift tax exclusion amount of $13,000 must be reported on that gift tax return.  If you later sell any of that portfolio, though, you will owe capital gains taxes on the difference between your friend’s basis in that stock and the sales price.   For example, if your friend owned stock in Y Corp., that she purchased for $1 dollar a share in 1982, and that stock is worth $100/share in 2013, you will owe capital gains on that $99/share rise in value.  Alternatively, if she gives you that portfolio upon her death, you will inherit it at the current fair market value for capital gains tax purposes.  In other words, if that Y Corp. stock is worth $100/share when your friend dies, and you later sell it at that price, you will owe zero in capital  gains taxes.  That portfolio will, however, be part of her taxable estate at her death, so, depending upon her other assets, her estate may or may not have to pay estate tax on those assets.  (Currently, she can give up to $5.12 million at death free of estate tax.) So, you and your friend should seek the advice of an accountant to see whether it makes sense for your friend to give you that stock via a Will or a trust upon her death, or during her lifetime.