About: Liza Weiman Hanks

Recent Posts by Liza Weiman Hanks

Can the Executor Give Away Estate Assets?

historic houseDear Liza: My husband is the sole executor (and only child) of his mother’s Will.  There are no other beneficiaries listed in her Will.  The only asset she had was a home which is valued at about $300,000.  Does he need to probate her Will?  As the executor can he sell the home to one of our children for $1.00? Whether or not your husband has to probate the Will depends upon your state’s small estates limit. In most states, an estate that falls below a certain threshold doesn’t have to go through a formal probate. To find out about your state’s small estate limit, click here. But my guess, is yes, a piece of real property that’s worth $300,000 doesn’t fall below that limit in any state that I can think of.

Whether or not your husband can sell the house for a dollar raises a different issue. The short answer is “No.” Your husband, as the executor, has to follow the terms of the Will (as does the probate court). So, at the end of the probate proceeding, the Court will distribute that house to your husband, since you’ve said that he’s the beneficiary under the Will. At that point, if he wants to sell it for 1$ to your kids, he can do so, BUT, the IRS will consider that a gift of the fair market value of the house, minus that one dollar. Essentially, your husband is giving the house to your kids, and pretending that he sold it to them, right? The IRS gets that, they’ve seen it before.

I’d advise your husband to consult with an estate planning attorney. Depending upon the terms of the Will and the time that’s passed since his mother died, he may be able to disclaim the gift and have it pass directly to your children, as a gift from their grandmother directly. A disclaimer is a legal no-thank-you that must be properly executed within nine months of the date of death and before a person has accepted any benefit from that gift. The house would pass to your children only if the Will says that, if your husband died first, it would then pass to his issue. (Not all Wills would say that, so this depends on what it says.)

If he can’t disclaim, he’s absolutely free to make such a gift himself. He’ll have to file a gift tax return by April of the following year, reporting the gift, but he won’t owe any gift tax on the gift because your husband, like all of us, currently has the ability to give up to $5.34 million during life or at death without paying any gift or estate tax.  The gift of $299,999 will use up that much of his available exemption, leaving him with a bit over $5 million more to use.

You also need to find out whether or not your state imposes an inheritance or estate tax. You’ve told me that you live in Pennsylvania, which does impose such a tax. Click here for a general guide to state inheritance and estate taxes, including Pennsylvania.

Disinheriting a Child

Last WillDear Liza: My husband and I both have a will that states we are each other’s beneficiaries and executor’s and our son as 100% beneficiary of both of us died,. My husband has a daughter by a previous marriage.  If my husband dies before me does she have rights to our assets? I often tell my clients the sad irony of estate planning: You can pretty much do whatever you want to do, you just have to die first.  So, in your husband’s case, he is not legally required to leave any money to his daughter from a previous marriage. I am assuming that she is not a minor and he has no other obligations to provide for her via a divorce settlement or the like.

What he needs to do, though, is acknowledge his daughter as his child in the Will, and then to say, explicitly, that he is deliberately choosing NOT to leave her anything under his Will. That way, she (the excluded daughter) cannot make a claim that he simply forgot to include her and make a claim based on her relationship to him. Mind you, she may very well not be happy about this and she may try and challenge the Will as being invalid in some way, but that’s a pretty hard thing to prove: your husband would either have had to lack the legal capacity to understand what he was signing or have been placed under undue influence to execute that Will (i.e. forced to sign) .

But there’s no keeping unpleasant secrets forever.  She’s going to know that she’s been excluded, when the time comes. Notice requirements vary state to state, but generally speaking, upon your husband’s death, she, as his daughter, will be entitled to notice of the probate proceeding and will be able to see a copy of the Will, even though she doesn’t inherit anything under the Will.

Creditor’s Claims and Trust Administration

debtsDear Liza: I am the successor trustee of my parents trust.  The have both passed and I was told before I disburse the assets I need to advertise a Notice to Creditors. How long and how many times do I need to advertise?  

Since I don’t know which state you live in, I can only provide you with a very general answer.  In most states, although not California, where I live and practice, if you are administering a trust, there’s no special creditor’s claim process that requires publication. Instead, creditors have a limited period of time in which to make a claim, and after that, it’s just too late. In California, again, that’s one year. In your state, it could be more, you’ll have to find out what the statute of limitations is after a death, you can try typing in “statute of limitations for claims against estate in _____” to your favorite web browser.

If there is a creditor’s claim process, that’s a way to accelerate the discovery and payment of creditors. Usually, that does involve publication that a person has died, and then there’s a specific number of days in which any creditors can make a claim against the trust’s assets (and this is less than the time allowed by that state’s statute of limitations). Once that claim is made, the Trustee has a certain number of days to either pay, or deny that claim. If a creditor fails to make a claim within the required time period, they are then barred, forever after, from making a claim.  This is similar to how creditor’s claims are handled in probate — a notice is given, a time limit runs, there’s a process for paying or contesting a claim, and then a creditor is barred. This is all an attempt to have some finality after a death, so beneficiaries can inherit without the fear of lurking liabilities out there.

As a general matter, you do need to pay the creditors that you know about, so all of the bills that have come due since your parents have died should be paid before you distribute anything from the trust to other beneficiaries. Also, please make sure to pay the taxes first, before any other creditors.  You should also know that secured debts, like a mortgage, do pass with the property that they are secured by. So, for example, if Sam inherits the house, and there’s a mortgage on that house, Sam is going to have to either pay that mortgage off, or get the lender to let him assume that mortgage himself (And that’s up to the lender…sometimes they will do it, sometimes they won’t. That depends on Sam and also on the terms of the mortgage.)

Finally, although you should, of course, pay outstanding credit card bills, you should know that the trust’s beneficiaries are NOT personally liable for such unsecured debts if the estate/trust has insufficient assets to pay those bills. I share this with you because bill collectors often neglect to make it clear that unsecured debts, like credit card debts, do not pass to the beneficiaries.

Your Living Trust can hold an S Corporation

letters-451524_640Dear Liza: My son and I own an S corporation.   Can an S corp be put into a trust?  If not how would an S corp be put into a trust? Yes! You can put your S corporation into your living trust by transferring your ownership of your shares to yourself, as Trustee of your living trust. As you know (but not all of my readers will), an S Corporation is a special kind of corporation, limited to 100 shareholders, in which the profits and losses of the corporation are passed through to the individual shareholders, to be reported on their individual returns.
 Most of my clients who have S corporations are small business people and are the sole shareholders of their S corporations. If that’s the case with you, then you need to get your corporate binder out and follow the formal procedures to reissue those shares to yourself as Trustee. If you have a corporate attorney, then ask that person to help you make sure that you observe the required formalities to transfer the shares.
While you are alive, there’s not a problem with holding the S Corp shares as Trustee. That’s because during your lifetime, your living trust is what’s called a “grantor trust.”  After your death, though, your trust isn’t a “grantor trust” any more.  At that point, the shares can be held by the trust for only two years withhold jeopardizing the S Corporation status for the other shareholders.  For many of my clients, this two year limit is not a problem, because the business won’t continue after the death of the owner.
If you want the trust to hold the shares longer than that,  however, you need to have special S Corporation provisions added to your trust, so that the trust can be a permitted shareholder under the IRS’s regulations–only certain kinds of trusts are allowed to hold stock in S Corps.  Click here for a good summary of these rules.

The Right Plan for Now: Living Trust

living trustDear Liza,  I’m a young professional and would greatly appreciate your feedback on what type of trust, if any, would suit me well given my current financial and life position.  I’m single, 29 years old (30 later this year), with cash, stocks, and a stake in a high-growth company.  My goal is to protect my assets while maintaining control and flexibility over their allocation / disbursement over time, especially in the event of unexpectedly passing or a disabling event (transfer to immediate siblings and parents).  I’m single and have no plans for marriage or children within the next 5-8+ years, but I would like to protect these going into a marriage as well as the value will likely be a magnitude greater than they are today). Those are all good questions, and congratulations for asking them way before most people give estate planning any thought (including, to be honest, me!)
A revocable living trust will, combined with a pour-over Will and a Durable Power of Attorney for Property Management,  accomplish most of the goals you’ve listed above. An estate plan like that will provide flexibility for you during your lifetime, keep your property separate when you do marry (if you do marry), allow someone (your successor Trustee and Agent under a Durable Power of Attorney) to manage your assets for you if you are incapacitated and transfer your assets to your siblings and parents if you die an untimely death in an efficient and relatively quick manner.
Here’s what it won’t do: protect your assets from creditors.  Revocable trusts exist to avoid probate upon your death and to allow others to manage assets for your benefit if you’re incapacitated, but, because they can be revoked by you at any time, the assets in that kind of trust are available to your creditors.  Business folks create entities, like limited liability partnerships, and corporations, to shield their personal assets from business risks/creditors, but an estate plan doesn’t do that. Hope that helps. Good luck.

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