Category Archives: Estate Planning Basics

Transferring a house from a trust

 Dear Liza: My grandfather died in 2008. My mother is the first successor on the trust. We did all the post administration for the trust or so we thought. I recently read that my mother should have filed a deed to get the house placed into her name since that is what the trust called for. We have not done this. My question is the following…My mother wants the house to go to me, her son. What process would we have to do in order to get it from the trust to me? Your grandmother can file the deed she didn’t file after your grandfather died, getting the house into your grandmother’s name, as Trustee of the trust created by your grandfather. Once that’s done, her ability to give that house to you during her lifetime depends upon the terms of the trust your grandfather set up. She may be able to give it to you during her lifetime, in which case you will receive it at the value that it had in 2008, when your grandfather died.  She may only be able to transfer it to you at her death, in which case you will inherit it at the value the house has at her death.  She may not be able to give it to you at all, because, as you said, the terms of your grandfather’s trust became irrevocable at his death. I would advise you to see an estate planning attorney in your state to review your grandfather’s trust and advise your grandmother on the best strategy to accomplish her goals.

As for that mortgage, if you get the property transfer completed, you’ll have to request that the lender assume the loan in your own name, which they may or may not do, that depends on their calculations and your credit history.

How the Estate Tax Works

Dear Liza: My dad just received about $200,000 in cash from his recently passed-away friend’s trust.  I wonder how he should file his tax for 2012?  I found several documents discussing about inheritance tax exemption being $5 million.  Does that only apply to family members and spouses? I love getting questions with clear answers! Your father’s inherited gift from his generous friend does not affect his income tax return for 2012.  Gifts are not ‘ordinary income’ under the tax code.  He gets that money TAX FREE.  It doesn’t matter what his relationship was to the generous friend.  But, if his generous friend’s estate was over the applicable federal exclusion from the estate tax ($5.12 million in 2012), his estate would have had to pay estate tax due.  That’s why it’s called the ‘estate tax’ and not the ‘inheritance tax’–the tax, if over the amount excluded from federal estate tax,  falls on the estate of the decedent, not on those who inherit the assets.

Do I Need a Living Trust?

Dear Liza: I am a 61 single retiree who has a single family home, an IRA, life insurance and a small pension. With my siblings as beneficiaries to these instruments. Is a living trust/will needed anyway? So, it’s true that if you have named beneficiaries for your IRA, life insurance and pension, those assets will go to those beneficiaries and your Will or Living Trust would have nothing to say about that part of your estate plan.  But, here’s the thing–in most states you cannot name a beneficiary for a house.  In those states, the only way to leave your house to certain people and avoid having to go through probate to do it, is to set up a living trust and transfer your house to that trust.  Click here for a list of the states that do permit the transfer of a house by naming beneficiaries on a deed–called a transfer-on-death deed. Sadly, California is not one of them.

Planning for incapacity

Dear Liza: My dad recently passed away and he and my mom had no will.  I am the only child and we have had all the bank accounts changed to my moms name and me as beneficiary but I don’t really know where else or what else (will or power of attorney) I should get.  Now that your mother’s just got you to take care of her if she gets sick, you should absolutely get her to sign a Durable Power of Attorney for Property and an Advance Health Care Directive. Both documents can name you as her Agent, the person who can pay her bills or make medical decisions if she’s unable to do so.   You said that she’s healthy now, and that’s great, but all of us get sick now and then and accidents do happen.  A Will is also a good idea, since that will make it easier for her to leave you her assets without your having to go through probate. (When one spouse dies, probate’s not usually necessary.)  All of these documents can be done inexpensively at www.nolo.com. Here’s the link to the Durable Powers of Attorney forms.

Beneficiary Designations Rule

Dear Liza: I live in the state of Oklahoma, my mother passed away unexpectedly. There was a $9,000.00 burial policy and a $12,000.00 life insurance policy, both policies were paid for by her but in my brothers name. Does my brother get to keep the life insurance policy?  Yep. He does. Your mother named him as the beneficiary for those policies, so he gets to keep the money.  Beneficiary designations like this trump whatever your mother’s Will said about her other assets.  If you take this to the probate court, they’ll tell you the same thing. Sorry.

Pension benefits

Dear Liza: My Dad passed away last year in the month of November.  Prior to Daddy’s death, he was receiving monthly pension benefits.  Once my step-mother notified the insurance company that Daddy had died, the company immediately withdrew his pension benefits from their checking account in the month of December.  Up to this date, my step-mother hasn’t been able to receive Daddy’s pension benefits.    Can the insurance company refuse to give my step-mother my dad’s pension benefits? Yes, they can. Pensions often terminate upon the death of the participant. Unlike an IRA or 401-K, traditional pensions are often promises of a monthly benefit for the lifetime of an employee, based on the length of time that employee worked for the company.  (IRA’s and 401-K plans allow an employee to save their own money during their peak earning years on a tax-deferred basis, so that they can withdraw the money after they’ve retired.  If they die with money left in those accounts, they can leave this money to a named beneficiary.)  Sometimes, a pension plan allows an employee to elect to take less during their lifetime so that their surviving spouse can receive benefits during his or her lifetime, but not always. If your father had a plan that only paid him a pension during his lifetime, your stepmother wouldn’t be entitled to any benefits under the plan.  Perhaps your stepmother can get clarification of how the pension worked from your father’s former employer.

Recovering Stolen Property in Probate

Dear Liza: I have a sister who came into my father’s house after he passed away and took  the only valuable item in the house.  My grandmother gave it to my father over 30 years ago.  It was in the house as long as I can remember.  I strongly protested and requested for her to return it back to my father’s estate since.  No positive response as to date.  It has been now over 2 years and we are not on talking terms. I have just been appointed as the administrator of my father’s estate. What is the legal solution of resolving this situation? As the administrator of the estate, you have a fiduciary duty to collect all assets owned by the estate.  I don’t know what state you live in.  In California, where I practice, the Probate Code allows you to file a petition with the probate court that requests the court to issue an order to your sister requiring return of the valuable object to the estate.  If the court agrees with your petition, it can issue that Order.  Enforcing the Order, though, is another matter.  (Your sister may just return the object; but, than again, she may not!) I suggest you consult a probate attorney in your area about drafting such a petition.

What Do I Put In a Living Trust?

Dear Liza:  I am trying to prepare a living trust on behalf of my father.  He owns his home and vehicles outright and also has two bank accounts.  I am the POD beneficiary of all of his accounts, as well as being a secondary signer on his checking and savings accounts.  My confusion comes from not knowing what assets should be put in the living trust.  Should it just be the home, since that has the highest value?  Or should the cars and bank accounts also be included?  Or can everything but the house be designated in the pour-over will that I also intend to create? Your father’s living trust has just one purpose: to allow his estate to avoid probate upon his death.  If your father’s assets are owned by the trust, not by him, when he dies, then his estate won’t need to go through probate.  Not all items are subject to probate, though: retirement accounts, life insurance policies and bank accounts with designated beneficiaries (that’s what a POD account is), go directly to the named beneficiary. Cars can be transferred via the DMV, and so don’t need to go through probate either. So, for your Dad, that leaves his house. You should transfer legal ownership of the house to his trust by filing a trust transfer deed with the county.  When you record the deed, you’ll also need to file a Preliminary Change of Ownership Form (PCOR).  This form tells the county assessor what kind of transfer just happened; the assessor wants to know if they can raise property taxes on that property, which they can’t, because a transfer to or from a living trust is NOT a change of ownership under Proposition 13. That pour-over Will is just a backup for your Dad. If he doesn’t transfer his house to the trust, and then dies, the Will says transfer whatever property he owned at death to this trust  (that’s the pour-over part). But, if the value of that property is more than $150,000, you’ll need to go through probate to make the transfer.  Put another way, the Will makes sure that all of your father’s assets get distributed as directed by the trust, but it won’t help his estate avoid probate first.

 

 

 

Funding subtrusts after the death of the first spouse

Dear Liza: In settling an AB trust I understand that 50% of the estate is to be placed in each of the A and B trusts. However, in our estate our house is worth more than all of the other equity. How can the estate be settled? With percentages of the home? Put the home in which trust?  That’s not a question you can answer in the abstract.  Those decisions get made after the first spouse dies.  First, you can’t know, now, what assets you’ll own then.  Second, in an A/B trust, the assets of the deceased spouse are used to fund a trust, often called a “B” trust or a “Unified Credit Trust,” up to the amount of money that’s excluded from the federal estate tax in the year of the first spouse’s death.  In 2012, that’s $5.12 million, but at the end of this year, that number falls to $1 million, unless Congress enacts new law. So, it’s not always going to “half” of the total trust estate, that will entirely depend upon the tax code in effect at the time your spouse dies. But, to answer part of the question you asked, the B Trust can be funded with a percentage of the house, and often is when there aren’t other assets that can be used to do so.

Property Taxes and Inheriting a House in California

Dear Liza: We are pondering whether or not to assume a home that belongs to my wife’s parents.  The home is currently being valued as part of an estate that will be designated to my wife and her brother.  Our question is will the property tax be adjusted from its purchase price in 1968 to its current estate value?  My wife’s parents lived in California.  No. If your wife’s parents left their house to their son and daughter,  the heirs can request an exclusion from reassessment from the county assessor where the house is located.  A parent can leave their primary residence to their children and there will be no reassessment upon that transfer. Your wife and her brother can inherit the house and pay the property taxes that their parents paid.  But they have to file a form requesting that exclusion from reassessment.  This form, called a Claim for Reassessment Exclusion for Transfer Between Parent and Child (Proposition 58), can be downloaded at each county’s assessor website.  Of course, if they someday sell the house to a new owner, that new owner’s property taxes will be calculated on the home’s new value.