Category Archives: Estate Planning Online

Planning for incapacity

Dear Liza: My dad recently passed away and he and my mom had no will.  I am the only child and we have had all the bank accounts changed to my moms name and me as beneficiary but I don’t really know where else or what else (will or power of attorney) I should get.  Now that your mother’s just got you to take care of her if she gets sick, you should absolutely get her to sign a Durable Power of Attorney for Property and an Advance Health Care Directive. Both documents can name you as her Agent, the person who can pay her bills or make medical decisions if she’s unable to do so.   You said that she’s healthy now, and that’s great, but all of us get sick now and then and accidents do happen.  A Will is also a good idea, since that will make it easier for her to leave you her assets without your having to go through probate. (When one spouse dies, probate’s not usually necessary.)  All of these documents can be done inexpensively at www.nolo.com. Here’s the link to the Durable Powers of Attorney forms.

Selecting Professional Executors

Hello Liza, My husband and I need to update our wills, they are terribly out of date.  Our dilemma is around the question of who should be Executor/Co-Executor of the estate. Obviously we would be the executors of one an others estates, however, if something were to happen to both of us, we need a third party Executor/Co-Executor.  We have no obvious relatives, or even close friends that we feel could ask to be an Executor.   We’ve understand that a law firm, bank, financial planner, etc.can act as an Executor (or co-Executor).  Our question is, what is the financial obligation for doing so?  Trust companies, trust departments of banks, and individuals, called professional fiduciaries, can serve as the executor of your estate.  There’s no up front fee for nominating an institution or professional to serve in that capacity. They would charge the estate a fee for their services if they are appointed to serve after the death of the second of you.  Often, these fees are a percentage of the estate. If your estate goes through probate, your executor is awarded statutory fees based on state law, which are usually a percentage of the value of the estate.  Attorneys sometimes serve in this capacity, but, at least in the state where I practice (California) there are strict rules about doing so, because in the past unscrupulous lawyers wrote themselves into client’s documents to generate future fees. Financial advisors often cannot serve due to conflict of interest rules in their companies, but some can.  I would advise you to ask your local bank or financial advisor what their fees would be for this service, or if they can recommend anyone in your area who could serve.