Category Archives: Living Trusts

Avoiding a Lump Sum Inheritance

pot of goldDear Liza My father wants to leave some of his assets to my brother and sister, however neither of them is particularly adept at handling money and he doesn’t want to hand them a large, lump sum. Can a Will stipulate that they receive payments on a predetermined basis, almost like an allowance? If not, can this be accomplished through another vehicle?

Your father isn’t the only parent worried about leaving money outright to kids.  He has a few options. Your father can leave money in his Will to a trust for the benefit of your brother and sister, and specify how the money is to be distributed to them. The trust itself is a part of the Will.  Leaving money in a trust by way of a Will is called a “testamentary trust,” because the trust is established after your father dies. This will require a probate proceeding in most states.

Alternatively, your father can create a trust now, and in that trust he can distribute assets to trusts for your siblings as well. This will accomplish the same result, but avoid a probate proceeding at your father’s death. Lastly, your father could, in a Will or a trust, instruct the executor or Trustee to purchase an annuity for your siblings upon his death, that pays out a certain amount of money over a certain period of time, or, he could purchase an annuity like that during his lifetime, to be paid upon his death.

Creditor’s Claims and Trust Administration

debtsDear Liza: I am the successor trustee of my parents trust.  The have both passed and I was told before I disburse the assets I need to advertise a Notice to Creditors. How long and how many times do I need to advertise?  

Since I don’t know which state you live in, I can only provide you with a very general answer.  In most states, although not California, where I live and practice, if you are administering a trust, there’s no special creditor’s claim process that requires publication. Instead, creditors have a limited period of time in which to make a claim, and after that, it’s just too late. In California, again, that’s one year. In your state, it could be more, you’ll have to find out what the statute of limitations is after a death, you can try typing in “statute of limitations for claims against estate in _____” to your favorite web browser.

If there is a creditor’s claim process, that’s a way to accelerate the discovery and payment of creditors. Usually, that does involve publication that a person has died, and then there’s a specific number of days in which any creditors can make a claim against the trust’s assets (and this is less than the time allowed by that state’s statute of limitations). Once that claim is made, the Trustee has a certain number of days to either pay, or deny that claim. If a creditor fails to make a claim within the required time period, they are then barred, forever after, from making a claim.  This is similar to how creditor’s claims are handled in probate — a notice is given, a time limit runs, there’s a process for paying or contesting a claim, and then a creditor is barred. This is all an attempt to have some finality after a death, so beneficiaries can inherit without the fear of lurking liabilities out there.

As a general matter, you do need to pay the creditors that you know about, so all of the bills that have come due since your parents have died should be paid before you distribute anything from the trust to other beneficiaries. Also, please make sure to pay the taxes first, before any other creditors.  You should also know that secured debts, like a mortgage, do pass with the property that they are secured by. So, for example, if Sam inherits the house, and there’s a mortgage on that house, Sam is going to have to either pay that mortgage off, or get the lender to let him assume that mortgage himself (And that’s up to the lender…sometimes they will do it, sometimes they won’t. That depends on Sam and also on the terms of the mortgage.)

Finally, although you should, of course, pay outstanding credit card bills, you should know that the trust’s beneficiaries are NOT personally liable for such unsecured debts if the estate/trust has insufficient assets to pay those bills. I share this with you because bill collectors often neglect to make it clear that unsecured debts, like credit card debts, do not pass to the beneficiaries.

Your Living Trust can hold an S Corporation

letters-451524_640Dear Liza: My son and I own an S corporation.   Can an S corp be put into a trust?  If not how would an S corp be put into a trust? Yes! You can put your S corporation into your living trust by transferring your ownership of your shares to yourself, as Trustee of your living trust. As you know (but not all of my readers will), an S Corporation is a special kind of corporation, limited to 100 shareholders, in which the profits and losses of the corporation are passed through to the individual shareholders, to be reported on their individual returns.
 Most of my clients who have S corporations are small business people and are the sole shareholders of their S corporations. If that’s the case with you, then you need to get your corporate binder out and follow the formal procedures to reissue those shares to yourself as Trustee. If you have a corporate attorney, then ask that person to help you make sure that you observe the required formalities to transfer the shares.
While you are alive, there’s not a problem with holding the S Corp shares as Trustee. That’s because during your lifetime, your living trust is what’s called a “grantor trust.”  After your death, though, your trust isn’t a “grantor trust” any more.  At that point, the shares can be held by the trust for only two years withhold jeopardizing the S Corporation status for the other shareholders.  For many of my clients, this two year limit is not a problem, because the business won’t continue after the death of the owner.
If you want the trust to hold the shares longer than that,  however, you need to have special S Corporation provisions added to your trust, so that the trust can be a permitted shareholder under the IRS’s regulations–only certain kinds of trusts are allowed to hold stock in S Corps.  Click here for a good summary of these rules.

The Right Plan for Now: Living Trust

living trustDear Liza,  I’m a young professional and would greatly appreciate your feedback on what type of trust, if any, would suit me well given my current financial and life position.  I’m single, 29 years old (30 later this year), with cash, stocks, and a stake in a high-growth company.  My goal is to protect my assets while maintaining control and flexibility over their allocation / disbursement over time, especially in the event of unexpectedly passing or a disabling event (transfer to immediate siblings and parents).  I’m single and have no plans for marriage or children within the next 5-8+ years, but I would like to protect these going into a marriage as well as the value will likely be a magnitude greater than they are today). Those are all good questions, and congratulations for asking them way before most people give estate planning any thought (including, to be honest, me!)
A revocable living trust will, combined with a pour-over Will and a Durable Power of Attorney for Property Management,  accomplish most of the goals you’ve listed above. An estate plan like that will provide flexibility for you during your lifetime, keep your property separate when you do marry (if you do marry), allow someone (your successor Trustee and Agent under a Durable Power of Attorney) to manage your assets for you if you are incapacitated and transfer your assets to your siblings and parents if you die an untimely death in an efficient and relatively quick manner.
Here’s what it won’t do: protect your assets from creditors.  Revocable trusts exist to avoid probate upon your death and to allow others to manage assets for your benefit if you’re incapacitated, but, because they can be revoked by you at any time, the assets in that kind of trust are available to your creditors.  Business folks create entities, like limited liability partnerships, and corporations, to shield their personal assets from business risks/creditors, but an estate plan doesn’t do that. Hope that helps. Good luck.

Planning Beats Avoidance

rural-216371_150Dear Liza: We live in Nebraska.  I own a ranch with my brother.  Part of it we inherited and a small part we purchased from family members.  The total value of the ranch is $2.7 million.  We have a buy sell agreement between us.  We have estate questions and aren’t sure where to go.  We each have other assets of approximately $2 million and $4 million respectively.  We have considered a trust; however I have two children and my brother has a second wife and four children.  We do not want our offspring to have to deal with each other.  

So, that’s a REALLY interesting question, and one that involves trusts, but only tangentially, really. The thing is, regardless of whether your estate plan consists of a Will or a trust, your families are most certainly going to have to deal with each other upon the death of you and your brother. You wrote that you own the ranch together….usually, siblings would own a ranch like that as tenants in common, which means that you each own one-half of it and are free to leave it to whomever you’d like to leave it to upon your death. (The less usual alternative, for siblings, would be as joint tenants, which would mean that the survivor would own the entire property at the death of one of you.)

Assuming you each own your half and can leave it at death to others, how on earth are you going to avoid each family having to work something out? Even a buy-sell agreement will require, at a minimum, that one family buys and the others sells, right? Placing your property into a trust will avoid having to go through probate, and gives you the opportunity to try and plan for reducing conflict down the road.  You can each place your interests in different trusts, and specify how each half should be managed upon your deaths.

If you don’t do a trust, then your estate will go through probate, and that in no way reduces the possibility of inter-family conflicts–in fact, it almost invites it, because probate is public, and all interested parties are required to get proper notice and have an opportunity to object to the proposed distribution. With a multi-million property on the table, I would advise you and your brother to hire a good estate planning attorney now to do what you can to anticipate problems and structure the management of the property down the road.

What’s a Testamentary Trust?

IRA moneyDear Liza:  I’ve read that I could create a trust for my children in a Will, then name that trust as a beneficiary of my retirement account.  That way, as I understand it, my successor Trustee could manage those retirement assets for my children until they grow up. But if I do that, will my estate have to go through probate before that trust can be established? Yes, in order to establish a trust that’s created by a Will, your estate would have to go through probate first.  What you are describing is called a ‘testamentary trust’ because the trust is created by a Will. The order issued by the court at the end of the probate will incorporate the terms of that trust.

To avoid probate altogether, you should use a living trust to create a trust for the benefit of your children, and put your assets in that trust before you die. You can name that trust as a beneficiary of your retirement account, and, after your death, the successor Trustee will work with the plan administrator for that retirement account to transfer the assets into the trust for your children.  That being said, if your children are over eighteen, it’s easier to name them directly as beneficiaries, rather than work through the medium of a trust–which has a slightly different set of rules for how the required minimum distributions are calculated.

What Do I Put In a Living Trust?

Dear Liza:  I am trying to prepare a living trust on behalf of my father.  He owns his home and vehicles outright and also has two bank accounts.  I am the POD beneficiary of all of his accounts, as well as being a secondary signer on his checking and savings accounts.  My confusion comes from not knowing what assets should be put in the living trust.  Should it just be the home, since that has the highest value?  Or should the cars and bank accounts also be included?  Or can everything but the house be designated in the pour-over will that I also intend to create? Your father’s living trust has just one purpose: to allow his estate to avoid probate upon his death.  If your father’s assets are owned by the trust, not by him, when he dies, then his estate won’t need to go through probate.  Not all items are subject to probate, though: retirement accounts, life insurance policies and bank accounts with designated beneficiaries (that’s what a POD account is), go directly to the named beneficiary. Cars can be transferred via the DMV, and so don’t need to go through probate either. So, for your Dad, that leaves his house. You should transfer legal ownership of the house to his trust by filing a trust transfer deed with the county.  When you record the deed, you’ll also need to file a Preliminary Change of Ownership Form (PCOR).  This form tells the county assessor what kind of transfer just happened; the assessor wants to know if they can raise property taxes on that property, which they can’t, because a transfer to or from a living trust is NOT a change of ownership under Proposition 13. That pour-over Will is just a backup for your Dad. If he doesn’t transfer his house to the trust, and then dies, the Will says transfer whatever property he owned at death to this trust  (that’s the pour-over part). But, if the value of that property is more than $150,000, you’ll need to go through probate to make the transfer.  Put another way, the Will makes sure that all of your father’s assets get distributed as directed by the trust, but it won’t help his estate avoid probate first.

 

 

 

I Inherited a House, Now What?

Dear Liza: My 90 yr. old mother recently died and I inherited her home, her only significant asset.  I  am preparing the Affidavit-Death of Trustee.  Does this put the title to the house in my name or do I also need a Quitclaim deed?  Do I need to create a new trust of my own or can it be left in the current one as I am a co-trustee? Sorry to hear about your Mom.  You are now engaging in what’s called “Trust Administration.”  The Affidavit Death of Trustee says that you are now the successor Trustee of your mother’s trust. (That means you have the legal authority to act under the trust with respect to the real property.) The next step for you is to then record a Trustee’s Deed transferring the property from that trust to yourself as an individual. (That gets the house to you outright and free of her trust.) If you want to set up a living trust, do that.  Then you’ll transfer the house from your own name to yourself, as Trustee of the new trust by recording a Trust Transfer Deed.  You can’t just leave the house in your mother’s trust, because now that she’s died, that trust is irrevocable and can’t be amended or changed.  Also, as Trustee, you’re just the manager of the assets, not the owner. You can use Nolo’s resources to create your own trust or work with an estate planner, that’s up to you.

Trusts and Pour Over Wills

Dear Liza,  My husband and I are having a disagreement about how to set up our living trust. (We are using online trust software.) He says that our will designates how to disperse the trust, after both of us die and the two designated trustees who are in charge of the trust will need to follow the will’s direction and that the trust is merely a holder of property and we don’t “need” to add all the beneficiaries to the trust document, that the will suffices. I say that we need to designate all the beneficiaries in the trust itself and clarify that all the property in the trust, unless specifically designated otherwise, will be inherited equally by our six children and that the will is for designating who gets the red pot or the carpet, etc., that sort of thing. Who’s right? So, one of the really nice things about being an estate planning attorney is that I hardly ever have to weigh in on marital disputes. On this one, though, I’m on your side. As a general rule, a living trust is designed to hold your property that would otherwise be subject to a probate proceeding at the death of the second of you–usually your house and your large brokerage and bank accounts. The assets in that trust pass by the terms of the trust itself. The ‘Trustees can’t follow the instructions in the Will, they have to follow what the trust says.

 The Will, in this scenario, is designed to transfer any assets that you owned at death that weren’t in the trust into the trust at that point. That’s why this Will is often called a ‘pour-over’ Will– like the saucer under a teacup, it picks up the property you’ve left outside of the trust and pours it into the trust (the cup) after your death. Often, too, your tangible personal property (jewelry, furniture, red pot, clothes, etc) are distributed under the terms of the Will, but sometimes these assets also pass into the trust to be distributed there.  So, make the trust the document that contains your wishes for the distribution of your estate, and let the Will just do the cleanup job for you.

Do I Need a Will and a Trust?

Dear Liza, is it necessary to have both a last will and testament if you have a living trust? Yes, that’s the way it is usually done. There are two main reasons for this.  First, if you have minor children, the Will is where you nominate guardians for them.  But also the Will provides an important way to make sure your trust is the one set of instructions for who gets what and how it’s managed.

 Here’s why: your trust holds the property that you transfer into it during your lifetime. You do this by either recording a deed (for real property) that transfers ownership from you as an individual to you as Trustee, or, in the case of a brokerage or bank account, by filing out paperwork that states that the account is owned by you, as Trustee.  (These are called Change of Title Forms at most institutions; sometimes Trust Account Applications or something similar.) However, most people don’t actually transfer all of their assets into such a trust.  When they die, often there are everyday checking and savings accounts, cars, or other assets outside of that trust.  Sometimes they have simply forgotten to transfer accounts that should have gone into the trust or refinanced a house and taken that house out of the trust in the process, then forgotten to put it back in. So, that’s where the Will comes in–it’s usually a special kind of Will, called a ‘pour-over Will’–and it says that all such property should be poured into the trust/transferred into the trust after a person’s died. That way all of a person’s property will be distributed via the trust.  A note of caution: if too much property is held outside of the trust, you will need a probate proceeding before you can transfer ownership to the trust (the trigger amount varies from state to state). So, don’t rely on that Will to make things work–make sure that your major assets are held by the trust during your lifetime.