Category Archives: Living Trusts

Can I Put Our House Into a Living Trust If I Have a Mortgage?

Dear Liza: Can we put our house into a living trust if we have a mortgage? Yes, you most certainly can. Almost everyone who does a living trust also has a mortgage. Federal law prohibits a lender from accelerating your loan (as in saying “pay up now”) if you transfer your home into a living trust. The only time having a mortgage and a trust can be a hassle is if you refinance — some lenders will require you to take the house out of your trust to get the new loan. Then, after the new loan is funded, you’ll have to put the house back in to the trust. It’s not really hard to do, but you have to record a deed for both steps: taking the house out and putting it back in. Sometimes your title officer can do it. Sometimes my clients will call me and ask my office to put their house back into the trust for them.

When to Fire Your Lawyer: Excessive Fees

Dear Liza, my brother and I are in the process of distributing the personal/real property of our recently departed mother’s estate/trust according to her wishes. The attorney for her estate initially included his fee of $17,000+ as part of one document. When questioned, he stated because of the divisive and hostile relation between my brother and me, he was going to charge fees in anticipation of the estate having to be probated, instead of treating it as an dissolution of an estate.  Can he do that? Yikes! $17,000 is A LOT of money to settle a living trust. Here’s my advice–fire that lawyer. Remember, you are the client and if a lawyer isn’t serving your needs (or is charging way too much), get yourselves a new one. Most attorney’s charge an hourly rate for trust administration services. At a rate of $200/hour (which is sort of low), you are being charged for EIGHTY FIVE hours of time. Most estates take only a fraction of that. As for his decision to submit the estate to probate–that’s your decision, not his. Probate can be an effective forum for resolving disputes, but in a trust administration that would be an unusual step. If the estate goes to probate, he can charge you a statutory fee equal to a percentage of the value of the assets in the estate, and $17,000 may actually be about right. But, he’s not entitled to bill you for services he hasn’t provided. Ask for a detailed billing statement outlining exactly how he is spending his time on your matter. If he can’t, or won’t, provide it, fire him and report him to the state bar. I have found that just mentioning your intention to report a lawyer to the state bar can result in an amazing reduction in an excessive bill. Also, ask for your client file on the way out–legally that’s yours, not his.

Trusts: Revocable v. Irrevocable

Hi Liza,  Please explain/define the differences between trusts. Specifically, what is a living trust, a revocable trust, and an irrevocable trust. Advantages? Disadvantages?  Here’s my answer for you: a LIVING trust and a REVOCABLE trust are almost always the same thing. Both are ways to describe a trust that holds assets during the lifetime of the person who established the trust ( the “Grantor”)  for that person’s lifetime benefit (the Grantor is also the trust “Beneficiary”). It’s a  living’ trust because it is established during the Grantor’s lifetime. It is revocable because during the Grantor’s lifetime they can revoke it any time they want to. A revocable living trust’s purpose is simply to avoid a probate of the trust’s assets after the Grantor dies. Instead of having to go through a court supervised probate proceeding (which costs money and takes time), the person named to manage the trust after the Grantor (the “Successor Trustee”) simply settles the estate as the trust directs (this also can cost money and certainly takes time, but usually less of both).

An IRREVOCABLE trust is a trust that can’t be amended or revoked once it is established. These are usually used when a person wants to give away money or other assets to another person, subject to certain terms that they don’t want to be changed. Once the gift is made to the trust, that person no longer owns those assets, which can be a tax advantage.  But such a trust can’t be changed without going to court and they can’t get the gift back, ever. Sorry to get long-winded on you, but my answer wouldn’t be complete without letting you know that after the Grantor of a revocable trust dies, that trust then becomes an irrevocable trust, because no one can change it’s terms after the Grantor’s death.

How Much Should A Living Trust Cost?

Dear Liza: What is a reasonable amount to pay for a lawyer to do a living trust? Here’s my rule of thumb: you should probably start by assuming that the whole process will take about 10 hours of an attorney’s time. This should include a face-to-face initial meeting to thoroughly discuss your goals, your family situation, and your finanicial assets.  The lawyer should then draft your documents, you should review them, and there should be some back-and-forth over the drafts. Some lawyers do this in a second meeting, some do it by phone or by email. Ultimately, though, you should finalize the language and get back together to sign the documents. Included in my estimate, by the way, is that the attorney will also be preparing a Will, a Durable Power of Attorney for finance, a Health Care Directive, and assist you in transferring your real property into the trust. If you are single, you can reduce the estimate to 8 hours. Since lawyer’s rates vary a lot around the country, just take my ten hours and translate that into the going rate where you live: in Northern California, where I practice, you can spend between $3000 and $5000, but in other parts of the country in could be much less.

Of course, that’s my estimate for something rather straight forward. If you need to do any planning for a child with special needs, or for parents, or have a second marriage, or have complicated assets, it can take longer.

Living Trusts and Property Tax in California

Dear Liza, My Wife and I own two pieces of real-property that we purchased long ago, in Los Angeles.  Because of Prop. 13, our property taxes are quite low. If we pass these properties to our children via a living trust, will they have to pay more property taxes? NO! I love being able to give you a simple, happy answer. But, you are in luck. By placing these properties into a living trust, you will be able to pass them to your children without a costly probate proceeding AND because you are passing properties from a parent to a child, they will inherit your property tax rate in both properties! The transfer of real property from parents to children is currently an exception to Property 13 reassessment. Your children will have to file a form requesting that this exception be applied to the properties within three years of the transfer, but unless the law changes in CA, they won’t be reassessed. For those of my readers who do not live in California, I apologize, this is a completely state-specific blog post. California passed Prop. 13 in the 1970″s, limiting the amount of property tax that’s assessed on real property until there’s a new owner, at that point, the property tax is applied to the then-current value of the property. However, parent-to-child is one of a few exceptions to this rule.