Dear Liza: My Mother passed in Feb of this year.  She opened a joint account with my Sister, so, should she become incapacitated, my sister could write checks on her behalf and it was opened with the understanding, that should something happen to my mother, the joint checking account should be split with her six other brother’s and sisters.  My sister is claiming the money is now hers to do with what she wants, who is right? This is one of those estate planning situations that come up a lot, and it’s also one where the law is clear, the moral obligations murky. Aged parents often put one child on an account like that, to make it easier to let them take care of their finances. But in making your sister the joint owner of the account, your mother also made her the legal owner of the money now because she is the surviving joint owner.  If your mother had wanted to make absolutely bullet-proof sure that any money in that account was to be split equally among all seven of you, she should have put that account into the trust (assuming that the trust splits everything seven equal ways) or named all seven of you as pay-on-death beneficiaries. But, of course, that’s no solace now. If your sister wants to honor your mother’s wishes, she could do that, but she’s not legally obligated to do so.