Dear Liza: My mother is 79 years old and is on social security.  She and her brother own a house together.  At this point, I really don’t care if her brother has control of the property.  But I do care if the contents of the house are legally given to him.  Does he have rights to the contents of the furniture in the house?   Does my mother need a Will and would that Will prevent her estate from going into probate?   Your mother’s furniture and furnishings are what’s called “tangible personal property.” This is lawyer-speak for all the stuff in her house: pots, pans, rubber bands, and the couch. That property will pass to you and your siblings if your mother executes a simple Will and gives her tangible personal property and any other assets she owns to her children.  If the house is owned in joint tenancy, the surviving joint tenant (your uncle) would own the property upon your mother’s death, by what’s called “right of survivorship.”  The house passes to him because of the way he and your mother owned it.  But the tangibles, and anything else your mother owned other than the house, would pass to her kids via her Will.  If all she really has at this point are those tangibles, no probate would be required because states exclude small estates from the necessity of a probate proceeding.  Nolo offers a simple Will that would do the trick.