Tag Archives: lawyers

What to Expect From Your Attorney

Dear Liza, I live in Wisconsin and met with an attorney on November 16, 2011, to discuss updating existing wills and powers of attorney for healthcare and property for my husband and myself.   It has been over three months since we met, and while I am ignorant of the ins and outs of the legal process, this seems an excessive amount of time to wait with no word.  How long is a reasonable period to wait for a draft of my will, and how should I approach my concerns with her? I am so sorry to hear that you’re having this sort of trouble. I think that you should discuss your concerns with her directly. Call her up. Ask her to call you back to discuss this. Tell her that you don’t want yet another email. Tell her that you need to see drafts within two weeks. Remember that YOU are the client and your attorney needs to be responsive to your concerns. If you aren’t happy with her, get a new lawyer.  You are completely within your rights to hire someone who is more responsive and to ask your first attorney to forward your client file to your new lawyer. As for what’s reasonable…well, it’s not that I haven’t occasionally been swamped myself, but I think two to three weeks from the initial consulation is a reasonable time to expect to see an initial draft, or at least to be contacted by your attorney with an apology for being late on the drafts. Good luck.

When to Fire Your Lawyer: Excessive Fees

Dear Liza, my brother and I are in the process of distributing the personal/real property of our recently departed mother’s estate/trust according to her wishes. The attorney for her estate initially included his fee of $17,000+ as part of one document. When questioned, he stated because of the divisive and hostile relation between my brother and me, he was going to charge fees in anticipation of the estate having to be probated, instead of treating it as an dissolution of an estate.  Can he do that? Yikes! $17,000 is A LOT of money to settle a living trust. Here’s my advice–fire that lawyer. Remember, you are the client and if a lawyer isn’t serving your needs (or is charging way too much), get yourselves a new one. Most attorney’s charge an hourly rate for trust administration services. At a rate of $200/hour (which is sort of low), you are being charged for EIGHTY FIVE hours of time. Most estates take only a fraction of that. As for his decision to submit the estate to probate–that’s your decision, not his. Probate can be an effective forum for resolving disputes, but in a trust administration that would be an unusual step. If the estate goes to probate, he can charge you a statutory fee equal to a percentage of the value of the assets in the estate, and $17,000 may actually be about right. But, he’s not entitled to bill you for services he hasn’t provided. Ask for a detailed billing statement outlining exactly how he is spending his time on your matter. If he can’t, or won’t, provide it, fire him and report him to the state bar. I have found that just mentioning your intention to report a lawyer to the state bar can result in an amazing reduction in an excessive bill. Also, ask for your client file on the way out–legally that’s yours, not his.