grandfather-506348_640Dear Liza: My parents have a revocable Trust that is very outdated and we want to make amendments to it. I understand most of the Trust but am having trouble with the Survivors Trust. I was surprised to see that upon the death of one spouse a Survivors Trust may be established. Is this really a necessary part of a Trust. Isn’t being the Co Trustee basically the same thing? A Survivor’s Trust is often created for tax planning. It’s common.  Many living trusts, especially those drafted prior to 2012 (when tax laws changed) are designed to minimize the estate tax at the second death. Trusts like that typically divide the trust estate into two trusts when the first spouse dies: one trust holds the decedent’s assets and is often called the Bypass Trust (or the Credit Trust); the other trust holds the survivor’s assets, and is called the Survivor’s Trust. Usually, the survivor can use assets in both trusts, but, to the extent that they don’t use up all the money in the Bypass Trust, that money passes estate tax free to the beneficiaries.  If your parents don’t have more than $10 million (like MOST people), their trust can most likely be simplified to just hold all of the assets in one, revocable trust after the first death. This trust is still often called the Survivor’s Trust. But this is all completely separate from who manages the trust, whatever it is called. That person is the successor Trustee, or, if appointed during your parents’ lifetimes, a co-Trustee. If you are helping your parents take care of their finances, and they’d like to help them manage their affairs, they can appoint you to serve with them now as a co-Trustee, or even resign, and let you take over as sole Trustee now.