Tag Archives: trustees

Leaving Money to a Kid That Can’t Handle It

safeDear Liza: My wife and I are are planning to initiate an estate plan soon but we keep running into the issue of how to leave everything to our 28 year old son. He would be the only recipient as we have no other children, but he has no financial proficiency whatsoever and we have no expectations that he will ever achieve any. We we fairly certain that if we just leave anything to him it will be gone in less than five years. I would like your advice on how to handle this situation. So, the first thing that I want to say is that you’re not alone. I work with lots of people who struggle with some variety of this issue. The second thing that I want to say is that it sounds like you have a fairly clear idea of what could happen if you left your son his inheritance outright and free of trust, so trust that.

No pun intended, but actually leaving his money in trust is one option. In your estate plan, you could leave him his money in a trust, and appoint a trusted friend, or a bank, or a financial company to serve as Trustee. The money could be for his benefit, but it would not be invested or distributed by him. That kind of trust could last for his entire lifetime, and, since it would be held in an irrevocable trust, would not be available to his creditors or to his spouse (if he got married). If you hold it in a lifetime trust, though, you should name an institution as Trustee, since your son would likely outlive a trusted friend of your generation. Another option would be to direct your Trustee to purchase an annuity for your son, that would guarantee a level payout over his lifetime. This is a good option sometimes, but if your son had an emergency need, such as medical care, an annuity wouldn’t be flexible enough to address that need.

Paying Credit Card Debt as Trustee

debtsDear Liza, My father passed away recently, and all of his and my mom’s assets are held in a living trust (except an individual checking account), of which I am now the Trustee.  A few collection agencies are now contacting me about collecting on some credit card balances, which are fairly significant.  From what I’ve read online, it sounds like debt collectors might not be able to lay any claims against the trust, but they can collect from the personal estate of the deceased (i.e. checking account or other assets held in the individual’s name).Is that understanding correct?  In case the debtors try to collect against the trust, I want to know our rights in that situation.  As Trustee, you are, actually, obligated to pay the debts of the Grantors (the people who created that trust) that you know about before you can distribute assets to the trust’s beneficiaries. That includes taxes and, in this case, credit card debt. If there are sufficient assets in the trust to pay those debts, you have to pay them. If there are insufficient assets in the trust to pay those debts, often you can, as Trustee, negotiate a lower payment with the companies — because that debt is not secured by anything (in contrast, say, to a house that secures a mortgage), the companies will often settle for less than the full amount rather than writing off the entire balance. If you don’t pay these debts and distribute the trust’s assets to the beneficiaries, these companies could, theoretically, go after the beneficiaries for payment from their inherited assets. Here’s an article that you might find helpful, too.

 

Amending a Survivor’s Trust

grandfather-506348_640Dear Liza: My parents have a revocable Trust that is very outdated and we want to make amendments to it. I understand most of the Trust but am having trouble with the Survivors Trust. I was surprised to see that upon the death of one spouse a Survivors Trust may be established. Is this really a necessary part of a Trust. Isn’t being the Co Trustee basically the same thing? A Survivor’s Trust is often created for tax planning. It’s common.  Many living trusts, especially those drafted prior to 2012 (when tax laws changed) are designed to minimize the estate tax at the second death. Trusts like that typically divide the trust estate into two trusts when the first spouse dies: one trust holds the decedent’s assets and is often called the Bypass Trust (or the Credit Trust); the other trust holds the survivor’s assets, and is called the Survivor’s Trust. Usually, the survivor can use assets in both trusts, but, to the extent that they don’t use up all the money in the Bypass Trust, that money passes estate tax free to the beneficiaries.  If your parents don’t have more than $10 million (like MOST people), their trust can most likely be simplified to just hold all of the assets in one, revocable trust after the first death. This trust is still often called the Survivor’s Trust. But this is all completely separate from who manages the trust, whatever it is called. That person is the successor Trustee, or, if appointed during your parents’ lifetimes, a co-Trustee. If you are helping your parents take care of their finances, and they’d like to help them manage their affairs, they can appoint you to serve with them now as a co-Trustee, or even resign, and let you take over as sole Trustee now.