If Reich Is Right, Should You Forget About Attracting Wealthy Donors?

stairwayNo matter what type of cause you fundraise for, Robert Reich’s recent blog, “When Charity Begins at Home,” is relevant to your work. Reich makes a convincing case that:

  1.  — Wealthy donors are increasingly removed from, and therefore uninterested in, the less fortunate members of society, and
  2.  — Even the purported generosity of affluent Americans is directed mostly at causes that directly serve them in return, such as their colleges, favorite music and arts institutions (for “hobnobbing” with their fellow elites), and so forth.

There’s a certain sense of inevitability about this. We’ve all read the headlines about the social divide between rich and poor increasing. And it doesn’t take a social scientist to tell us that people (potential donors included) have less sympathy for people whose lives seem utterly alien to them.

So, where does this leave nonprofits who do serve the poor, or immigrants, or workers, or the disabled, or any other group that’s not on the radar screen of the 1%?  Other than frustrated, that is.

Simply recognizing the dynamic that’s at work is a good start. That will help avoiding wasting your time courting prospective donors who may never be interested in your cause.

It may also change your language and approach. Think about, for instance, how your cause interests wealthy donors at a personal level. Find tie-ins between the lives of those you serve and those of your prospective donors. If, for instance, you’re working with a particular young immigrant or a youth who has been accepted into an Ivy League college but is hindered by something that you’re trying to help with, that person’s story might be a good one to highlight. Work those points of connection!