“Just seeing the look on the faces of those kids . . . .”

waterA recent article in the East Bay Monthly, called “In the Philanthropic Swim” contained a powerful reminder of how donors’ giving instincts are fueled not just by knowing that they’ve made a difference, but actually seeing that they’ve made a difference.

The article describes an Oakland couple,  John Bliss and Kim Thompson, who wanted to invest in their local community. They created a fund through which they’ll donate $100,000 to the Oakland Park and Recreation Department in order to pay for swim lesson scholarships for local kids; and also created a program offering rec centers grants of up to $2,500 for special programs or needs.

What struck me about the article was Thompson’s description of how she “knew” that the grant money was well invested. It wasn’t based on dollar metrics or painstakingly written reports. She said, in describing a grantee (deFremery Park) that had used its funding to renovate basketball courts,  “Just seeing the look on the faces of those kids when they saw the beautiful courts and the Warriors players at the grand opening made us know that was money well invested.”

Bliss echoed her sentiment, saying, “The joy of seeing the looks on those young boys’ and girls’ faces . . .  is something we will never forget.”

Because they’d spearheaded and funded this effort, they of course got direct access to the results. But wouldn’t it be wonderful if a wider pool of donors and funders could be brought into direct contact with the recipients or results of their generosity?