Category Archives: Individual Giving

“Just seeing the look on the faces of those kids . . . .”

waterA recent article in the East Bay Monthly, called “In the Philanthropic Swim” contained a powerful reminder of how donors’ giving instincts are fueled not just by knowing that they’ve made a difference, but actually seeing that they’ve made a difference.

The article describes an Oakland couple,  John Bliss and Kim Thompson, who wanted to invest in their local community. They created a fund through which they’ll donate $100,000 to the Oakland Park and Recreation Department in order to pay for swim lesson scholarships for local kids; and also created a program offering rec centers grants of up to $2,500 for special programs or needs.

What struck me about the article was Thompson’s description of how she “knew” that the grant money was well invested. It wasn’t based on dollar metrics or painstakingly written reports. She said, in describing a grantee (deFremery Park) that had used its funding to renovate basketball courts,  ”Just seeing the look on the faces of those kids when they saw the beautiful courts and the Warriors players at the grand opening made us know that was money well invested.”

Bliss echoed her sentiment, saying, “The joy of seeing the looks on those young boys’ and girls’ faces . . .  is something we will never forget.”

Because they’d spearheaded and funded this effort, they of course got direct access to the results. But wouldn’t it be wonderful if a wider pool of donors and funders could be brought into direct contact with the recipients or results of their generosity?

 

Gripes About Direct Mail Appeals

2013-Nickel-Unc-obv_D_2000Has anyone yet come up with a replacement for direct mail solicitation as a funding source? No, I didn’t think so. Individual donors still comprise the bulk of nonprofit funding, and direct mail is a tried and true way of reaching them.

(Email? Just a variation on the mail theme. Crowdfunding? Nah, best for small projects of limited duration.)

The trouble is, the tried and true sometimes becomes the tired and annoying. Or is it just me who groans at receiving yet another thick envelope that I have to open up, tear my name off the various contents of, and check for any U.S. currency before preparing the now-ragged pile for its trip to the recyling bin?

It’s apparently not just me. Or at least, not according to the results of my entirely informal, unscientific survey of friends. I asked what aspects of charity mail appeals most got their goat.

There was no shortage of answers, with most falling into one (or more) of four categories: cost, frequency, freebies, and over-the-top entreaties. Here are some of the actual replies:

Cost:

  • “Using all your money to send you more appeal letters.”
  • “Those that come with a nickel glued on – it shows they don’t need mine.”

Frequency:

  • “When the next appeal comes before the thank-you for the previous donation!”

Freebies:

  • “I don’t like when they send address labels or greeting cards — such a waste of paper.”
  • “I hate the mailing labels or small change (“a nickel will do x!”). Feels manipulative.”

Over-the-top entreaties:

  • “Dogs with sad eyes.”
  • “Animal charities that target children (sending progress reports on a particular animal) and then use the kids to pressure their parents to make a larger monthly donation (your ‘own’ animal needs more food, a new bed, etc).”
  • “Membership cards that imply you’ve already committed and they are just following up to get the money.”
  • “The . . . ones where you innocently open them and are confronted with a poor kid with a harelip or no arms . . . .”
  • “I hate the ones that are in a blank envelope that look like reports from a credit bureau or something else that matters so you can’t toss them without opening them.”
  • “I know there’s research behind it — but I HATE letters that end with a p.s. & question (Won’t you help TODAY?)”

Of course, there is research behind nearly everything that a nonprofit puts into a direct mail piece. And for everyone who hates the address labels, there’s probably someone who likes them. (Actually, that would be me. I’m running short. Could some group . . . uh, never mind.) But isn’t it a bit disturbing that people can so readily recite a list of the common strategies?

For more on direct mail and other forms of fundraising, see the 2013 edition of Effective Fundraising for Nonprofits, by Ilona Bray (Nolo).

If Reich Is Right, Should You Forget About Attracting Wealthy Donors?

stairwayNo matter what type of cause you fundraise for, Robert Reich’s recent blog, “When Charity Begins at Home,” is relevant to your work. Reich makes a convincing case that:

  1.  – Wealthy donors are increasingly removed from, and therefore uninterested in, the less fortunate members of society, and
  2.  – Even the purported generosity of affluent Americans is directed mostly at causes that directly serve them in return, such as their colleges, favorite music and arts institutions (for “hobnobbing” with their fellow elites), and so forth.

There’s a certain sense of inevitability about this. We’ve all read the headlines about the social divide between rich and poor increasing. And it doesn’t take a social scientist to tell us that people (potential donors included) have less sympathy for people whose lives seem utterly alien to them.

So, where does this leave nonprofits who do serve the poor, or immigrants, or workers, or the disabled, or any other group that’s not on the radar screen of the 1%?  Other than frustrated, that is.

Simply recognizing the dynamic that’s at work is a good start. That will help avoiding wasting your time courting prospective donors who may never be interested in your cause.

It may also change your language and approach. Think about, for instance, how your cause interests wealthy donors at a personal level. Find tie-ins between the lives of those you serve and those of your prospective donors. If, for instance, you’re working with a particular young immigrant or a youth who has been accepted into an Ivy League college but is hindered by something that you’re trying to help with, that person’s story might be a good one to highlight. Work those points of connection!