Attending Naturalization Oath Ceremony Could Have Saved Immigrant From Deportation

A recent case out of the Third Circuit Court of Appeals, called HECTOR DURAN-PICHARDO, Petitioner v. ATTORNEY GENERAL OF THE UNITED STATES, is a good reminder of why attending and passing your naturalization interview (for U.S. citizenship) is not enough by itself. You’ve got to actually complete the oath ceremony before you will be considered a U.S. citizen — and receive the benefits and protections that come with that status.

Mr. Duran-Pichardo, originally from the Dominican Republic, became a U.S. lawful permanent resident in 1981. He applied for naturalization in 1997, and attended his naturalization interview in 1998.  Apparently, he passed the examination, though he was given only a document stating that the “INS will notify you later of the final decision on your application.”

The trouble arose when the INS never got around to sending him that “decision,” much less an appointment for his oath ceremony. Mr. Duran-Picardo tried to call the agency many times, but says he ultimately was told that all or part of his naturalization file had been lost. At that point, he seems to have given up.

That was a bad idea, especially in light of Mr. Duran-Pichardo’s later activities: In 2008 (nearly ten years later), he pled guilty to conspiracy to distribute and possess narcotics and possession with intent to distribute cocaine. The sentence was 51 months’ imprisonment.

Later in 2008, the U.S. government began removal proceedings against Mr. Duran-Pichardo, alleging that he was deportable both due to the controlled substance violation and as an aggravated felon. In his defense, he claimed that he was either a U.S. citizen or should have been, given that the U.S. government itself was at fault in failing to finalize his naturalization application.

That argument got him nowhere. As is typical in cases where the U.S. immigration bureaucracy is at fault, it takes no responsibility for the consequences. This also illustrates the severe immigration consequences of any type of drug crime.

This case might not create much sympathy or worry for other U.S. citizenship applicants who think, “No problem, I’m not planning to sell drugs.” Nevertheless it’s an important reminder of the need to track the scheduling of your citizenship oath ceremony, and attend it when scheduled. Far less severe actions than a drug crime can make a person deportable — for example, see my article, “Can I Really Be Deported for Failing to Advise USCIS of My Change of Address?” What’s more, you need to maintain your eligibility for citizenship right up to the day of the oath ceremony. The longer it gets put off, the greater the risk that something will happen to affect your eligibility.