Will Immigration Reform Expand Rights to Government-Paid Attorneys?

briefcaseIf you were interested in the issues discussed in my recent post called “A Few Immigrants, at Least, Will Now Get Free Immigration Lawyers,” be sure to check out Mark Noferi’s article in Slate, “Deportation Without Representation.”

Noferi, a J.D. from Stanford who teaches immigrants’ rights at Brooklyn Law School, points to a little-noticed piece of the proposed Senate bill: one that would provide government-paid legal representation to some noncitizens in removal proceedings, namely unaccompanied children, people with a serious mentally disability, or those who are “particularly vulnerable” compared to others in the same situation. (See pp. 567-568 of the bill for the actual language.)

For my money, nearly every noncitizen who can’t afford a lawyer is “particularly vulnerable.” They often don’t speak much English, they’re unfamiliar with the U.S. legal system, and they’re up against a body of law that’s confusing, counterintuitive, and often bizarrely punitive.

Noferi, however, focuses on detained immigrants as especially high on the vulnerability list. His description of the detention centers in which tens of thousands of immigrants spend months and years of their lives waiting to see a judge is apt, noting that they are: “routinely denounced for substandard conditions, such as moldy food, poor medical care, overcrowding, excessive force, shackles, and solitary confinement.” Like all generalizations, this doesn’t even begin to convey the awfulness of putting human beings who have committed no crime into a prison being run by people who treat them as if they had. (I’ve visited these places. They suck.)

Let’s hope this portion of the Senate bill survives intact — and is eventually expanded.