What “Deported to Mexico” Literally Means

ICE arrestWhen a foreign national is ordered deported from the U.S. (usually because the person was undocumented or committed some violation of the law), the one and only “perk” is a free trip to his or her home country. It’s a trip reportedly taken by a record 409,949 people in the 2012 fiscal year.

If my “free trip” comment sounds flippant, let me tell you a story I once heard from an immigrant rights advocate. He had a client from Mexico who would spend most of his time in the U.S. but then, when ready for a visit home, turn himself into the immigration authorities for deportation. Free ride! (The fun ended after Congress tightened up on the penalties for reentry after deportation.)

In any case, we’re not talking about luxury travel here.  Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) typically flies deportees to the capital city of their home country, sometimes sedated or in manacles. There, if they’re lucky, their country’s government may provide them with van rides or other services. If not, they’re on their own — often after years or decades away.

Mexico is, however, a different case. Because it shares a land border with the U.S., ICE policy has, in the past, been to bus deportees to towns just across the border, such as Tijuana or El Paso. Recently, however, ICE has begun flying some deportees to Mexico City. They claim that this policy protects deportees from targeting by kidnappers and smuggling gangs who operate along the border, and say it will reduce return trips to the United States.

Critics of the policy note, however, that it is costly for the U.S. and has not resulted in any apparent reduction of attempts to unlawfully cross the U.S. border.