Green Card Holder Forever?

usil-blog.jpgSome U.S. immigrants literally count the days from when they receive their green cards, waiting for the five (or in some cases, three) years to pass before they can apply for naturalized U.S. citizenship. And given all the benefits that come with U.S. citizenship — easier travel in and out of the U.S., ability to sponsor a wider group of family members for a green card, access to government jobs, and so on — this is widely assumed to be the sensible approach for anyone planning to live permanently in the United States.

As pointed out in a recent article in The New York Times, however, called “Making Choice to Halt at Door of Citizenship” (by Kirk Semple), that’s not how many immigrants see the matter. Many are content with a green card alone — even if they fully qualify for citizenship and would be permitted dual citizenship in their home country — for reasons that include:

  • national identity — they want to retain a tie to their home country and don’t necessarily “feel” American
  • trauma — the process of dealing with U.S. government officials the first time around is more than they want to face again (don’t laugh, it can be a hellishly difficult bureaucracy to deal with)
  • the $680 application fee
  • the perception that they already have nearly all the same rights as U.S. citizens, including the right to work in the U.S.
  • dissatisfaction with U.S. government or its foreign policy
  • the “cool” factor — a U.S. passport seems less glamorous than it once did, and finally
  • inertia — they just haven’t gotten around to applying.

This is, of course, a personal decision, and nothing in the law requires green card holders to apply for U.S. citizenship. For the people dealing with “inertia,” however, I offer just one phrase: “Change of address requirement.”

If you’re having trouble getting it together to apply for U.S. citizenship, might you also fail to do as required — or have you already failed in this required task — and advise the U.S. government within ten days of every time you move to a new address? It sounds trivial, but messing this one up is a deportable offense. For real. See the articles on the “After Getting Your Green Card: How to Keep It” page of Nolo’s website for details.

Me, I’d pay the fee, deal with the symbolic significance, and lower my cool factor just to know I couldn’t be deported on grounds as seemingly minor as these. (And the change of address notice is just one item on the list of grounds of deportability . . . . )