Check Your Passport BEFORE Submitting Form N-400 Naturalization Application

airplanePicture this: You fill out Form N-400, the application for U.S. citizenship. On one of the questions, you’re asked to list all your trips outside the U.S. for the past five years. “That’s easy, I haven’t taken any trips for at least five years,” you think, and enter “N/A” in this section.

The day of your interview arrives. You go over the list of what you need to bring to the interview. It includes the passport of your home county. You dig through your possessions until you finally find the passport, and rush to your interivew.

Everything at the interview is going well. Your spoken and written English are fine, and you’ve memorized the history and government questions and easily pass this part of the test. Then the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) examiner opens your passport. “Hmm, there’s a visa stamp showing that you HAVE traveled outside the U.S. in the last five years,” she notices.

Uh oh. This is exactly the situation faced by an applicant with whom I reasonably spoke — a careful, professional person, whose memory had just happened to lapse slightly when it came to the matter of recent travel. And now the applicant was facing a USCIS examiner who was suddenly suspicious about the discrepancy between what was written on the N-400 application and what the passport showed.

Fortunately, after some embarrassed explanation, this applicant was able to convince the examiner that the undisclosed travel was a mere oversight, and obtained approval for U.S. citizenship. But not every applicant is going to meet a similarly understanding examiner.

The lesson here is simple: No matter how good you think your memory, check your passport and any other official documents concerning matters to be entered on your N-400 application for U.S. citizenship. For more information on the application process, see the book, Becoming a U.S. Citizen: A Guide to the Law, Exam & Interview (N0lo).