This Is News: Actual Enforcement Against Shady Immigration Consultants!

oakland courtIn today’s news piece, “Judge: Co. Owes $15M in Botched Immigration Forms,” NBC Bay Area states that the Oakland City Attorney has obtained a $15.1¬† million court judgment against a fraudulent immigration consulting¬† business, so-called “American Legal Services.” This company’s actions — we can’t call them legal services, because there seems not to have been a single attorney on staff — are said to have resulted in many Oakland families who were seeking immigration help losing vast amounts of money or winding up in removal (deportation) proceedings.

This story is both surprising and not. The “not surprising” part is that immigrants and their families are prey for unscrupulous fraudsters. That’s been going on for years.

Every immigration attorney has had clients come to them after their case was botched by someone who had no idea what they were doing, but pretended otherwise and charged a lot of money. Many use the name “notario,” because in the Spanish-speaking community, it implies someone with actual training, while in the U.S., it just means someone who’s a notary public — that is, can confirm your signature using a rubber stamp.

The surprising part is that someone is actually doing something about it! Immigrants are seemingly so low on the list of societal priorities that such issues often go unaddressed by enforcement authorities — even when all the evidence is right in front of their faces.

I once had a case where a client paid a fraudster to put a green card stamp in her passport (a stamp which he’d somehow acquired straight from U.S. immigration authorities). You’d think that would have been seen as a serious matter by anyone within the immigration system. But when I pointed it out to the attorney for the Department of Homeland Security, and urged him to go after the guy, he shrugged. As far as I know, that was the end of it.

But let’s hope the Oakland court judgement is a sign of more enforcement to come. If you’ve been harmed by a fraudulent immigration service provider, you can add to the push for further enforcement by reporting it to the police, district attorney’s office, and state bar association. And if you’re seeking immigration services, see “How to Avoid a Sleazy Immigration Lawyer” for more information.