How Much SHOULD a Diplomat’s Maid Be Paid?

illegal contractIf you’ve been following the headlines about the deputy consul general from India, Devyani Khobragade, whose arrest in New York over having submitted false documents to the U.S. government regarding the amount she was paying her housekeeper is sparking an international incident, you may have wondered: How much SHOULD she, by law, have been paying her maid?

If all that went by too fast, here’s a little more background: The deputy consul came to the U.S. on a diplomatic visa called an A-1. This visa allows its holders to bring along domestic staff from their home country — on the condition that they pay them the higher of:

  • the prevailing wage in that region, or
  • the federal or state minimum wage.

(Read more about this visa on the State Department’s page describing “Visas for Diplomats and Foreign Government Officials.”)

Ms. Khobragade brought a housekeeper along, and despite her apparent promises to the U.S. government that she would pay her housekeeper $4,500 a month, allegedly paid her a mere $573 a month, for work far in excess of 40 hours per week.

So, back to the original question regarding appropriate payment. For starters, the deputy consul obviously should have paid the amount promised in the visa application on behalf of the housekeeper, namely $4,500 a month. Making false statements on U.S. immigration applications is grounds for becoming inadmissible, that is, unable to receive future U.S. visas or immigration benefits.

As for the minimum the deputy consul should have offered, one must determine this by going to the Department of Labor’s “Foreign Labor Certification Data Center” website. For the New York Metro area, and the position of “Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners,” my search came up with a minimum figure of $10.32 per hour or $21,466 a year, which works out to $1,789 per month. Since that figure is higher than the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour, that’s what the housekeeper likely should have received at the very least — less than the amount originally promised, but far more than the amount apparently paid!

Obviously there are major questions about the way this case was handled, with an arrest outside the deputy consul’s daughter’s school, and alleged strip searches (looking for what?! the missing wages?). But setting that aside, should the deputy consul be allowed to claim diplomatic immunity to avoid meeting basic (and not overly generous) U.S. immigration and labor laws?

According to journalist Sandip Roy, India’s diplomats have a history of flouting U.S. labor laws. Roy concludes, “As consular staff member representing India abroad, Ms Khobragade enjoys many rights. The right to a domestic help at cut-rate wages however is not one of them.”