Justin Bieber “Stuck in the Moment” of a Pending Removal Proceeding?

After years of exploring immigration law’s darkest corners, I can say with some certainty that:

  1. throwing eggs at your neighbor’s house is not on the list of grounds of deportability, and
  2. nor is being the subject of a petition to the White House alleging that you have “wrongly represented” the U.S. “in the world of pop culture.”

I hope that’s of some comfort to Justin Bieber fans.

eggbrokenIf you’re unfamiliar with the hoopla, CNN did a fine job of outlining both what Canadian-born pop singer Justin Bieber is currently suspected of (felony vandalism, so far, based on the egg-throwing incident; with possible charges for driving while under the influence of drugs, though it’s not clear that he was doing the driving). See CNN’s “Could Justin Bieber be deported?” and “Justin Bieber egg probe ‘tightening up'; prosecutor wants more investigation.”

The CNN articles also discuss what these accusations might mean for Bieber’s immigration status. He’s apparently in the U.S. on an O visa, for people with “extraordinary ability in the sciences, arts, education, business, or athletics.”

People who are legally in the U.S., like Bieber, can be deported for committing a crime that’s listed on the grounds of deportability within U.S. immigration law. (Juvenile crimes are sometimes an exception, but contrary to appearances, the Biebs is already 19.)

Nothing Bieber is alleged to have done so far seems to make experienced immigration attorneys think he fits either of the main two criminal grounds of deportability, namely a “crime of moral turpitude” (one that shocks the public conscience) or an “aggravated felony (which doesn’t have to have “felony” in the name, but can include various types of misdemeanors).

Bieber could, however, face removal proceedings if he has drug issues. The immigration law contains two separate grounds of deportability for drug use: one that makes people deportable if they’ve been convicted of a drug crime (or an attempt), with an exception for a single offense involving possession for personal use of 30 grams or less of marijuana; and another for being a drug abuser or addict.

Notice that no actual court conviction is needed to be deportable under the drug abuse/addict section. The person’s own confession to drug use could be enough. Bieber appears to have already told the police who pulled him over in a traffic stop that he’d been drinking, using marijuana, and taking prescription pills. (Oops. It’s never a good idea to drink so much that you get into a confessional mood like that.)

Of course, one could face worse fates than being deported to Canada. But, depending how all this plays out, Bieber could face a bar on returning to the U.S. for a long time after deportation — long enough to lose those baby cheeks.

P.S. Should we be shocked or impressed that he poses for a mugshot like it’s just another publicity still?