Oh, and Justin Bieber’s Alleged Assault on a Limo Driver Probably Won’t Get Him Deported, Either

canada policeIn yesterday’s blog, I took a look at whether Justin Bieber could realistically face deportation (removal) for various types of trouble he’s gotten into while living in the United States on an O-1 visa.

But today’s headlines raise another question: If he’s convicted for assaulting a limo driver in Canada (as he’s been recently charged with by Toronto police), could that foreign conviction lead him to be deported from the United States?

The first issue here is whether a foreign conviction can be held against someone in the U.S. and make them deportable. No one should be surprised to hear that the answer is, “Yes.” However, to protect people against being deported for something that’s not even illegal in the U.S. (for example, depositing your chewing gum on the sidewalk, which I once read is illegal in Singapore, though you shouldn’t quote me on that), the foreign conviction has to parallel a crime on the books in the United States.

Of course, assault is illegal here. Bieber is said to have been one of six passengers picked up by a limo driver on December 30 of last year, who got into an altercation that led to the limo driver being hit on the head several times. (The driver’s okay, but will probably never allow his children to see Bieber in concert.) So finding a parallel U.S. statute will not likely be an obstacle, were U.S. immigration officials inclined to try to deport the Biebs.

The bigger issue is whether assault can be the basis for deportation of someone legally within the United States. To constitute a “crime of moral turpitude” (one of the main criminal grounds for deportability, depending on length of sentence and number of offenses), it would likely have to be an “aggravated assault.” Given that the driver in this case was able to stop the limo, get out, and call the police, I’m going to hazard a guess that this won’t be seen as rising to the level of “aggravated.”

But the analysis isn’t over yet: The next question is whether the assault is an “aggravated felony,” which is also a basis for deportation. Bieber’s lawyer says it’s likely to be treated as the equivalent of a misdemeanor in Canada — which doesn’t tell us much, because owing to the vagaries of U.S. immigration law, misdemeanors can be treated as felonies! Crimes of violence with a sentence of it least one year are considered aggravated felonies. Given the low level of injuries in this case, I doubt Bieber will get a year-long sentence — if he’s even convicted in the first place. (Let’s not forget, these are all allegations at this point, plus a lot of media hype.)

So, to the more than 200,000 petition signers who say that “We would like to see the dangerous, reckless, destructive, and drug abusing, Justin Bieber deported,”  don’t hold your collective breath. Solid legal grounds upon which to do seem not to have actually arisen yet. (And BTW, the headline on your petition is inaccurate: He doesn’t have a green card. It’s a temporary work visa.)