Countries From Which It’s Hardest to Get a Visitor (B-2) Visa to the U.S.

jigsaw in blue with five missing piecesThe U.S. Department of State (DOS) recently released statistics showing what percentage of applicants from various countries have been denied tourist or visitor visas in 2013 and earlier years. In some cases, the refusal rate isn’t just high, it’s overwhelming — that is, a majority of applicants get a “No” answer.

You might as well not even try applying for a visitor visa if you’re from Micronesia or Serbia and Montenegro. The refusal rate in those locations is 100%. Yes, you read that right — everyone who asks for a visa is apparently refused. Or perhaps the few who are approved are statistically insignificant (though they should really break out the champagne).

Also high on the refusal list are Somalia (65.8%), Djibouti (62.6%), (Afghanistan (62.7%), Ghana (61.8%), Laos (61.4%), Cuba (61.1%), Liberia (59%), Tajikistan (53.7%), Burundi (52.7%), and Mauritania (50%). (Hey, are the consular officers just flipping coins in Mauritania?)

Looking over this list, a certain pattern emerges. The countries with high refusal rates also have difficult civil or economic situations, as a result of which many people may be looking for a way out — in other words, bringing the kids to Disneyland is probably the last thing on their minds or within their budgets. And the U.S. government must, by law, deny visitor visas to anyone who looks as though their real intention is to make the U.S. their permanent home.

For more on the eligibility criteria for a U.S. visitor visa, see “Visiting the U.S. for Business, Pleasure, or Medical Treatment.”