Fee Hikes an Overlooked Aspect of Proposed Immigration Reform

mex border fenceThe legislation being hammered out in the Senate right now contains some pretty expensive elements. Specifically, committing even more resources than have already been thrown at the project of turning the U.S. border with Mexico into an impenetrable barrier is going to cost big bucks. Some $40 billion, to be spent on new border security agents, new drones, new fencing, and so on.

And where will this money come from? Much media attention was devoted recently to a U.S. government report showing that, if the bill is passed, the U.S. government and economy will actually get a boost. New taxpayers will contribute to the system, more undocumented immigrants will start new businesses, and all will hum along happily.

But that shouldn’t obscure a basic reality of the legislation as it stands, containing a recent compromise amendment from Senators Corker, Hoeven, and others. As noted in a recent press release from the American Immigration Lawyers’ Association (AILA), the spending on this bill isn’t going to come from the taxes and economic activity generated by these hardworking immigrants. It looks, for all the world, like it’s going to come straight from the immigrants pockets, as fees when they file their applications for immigration benefits.

AILA explains, “a startling and little-publicized requirement of the amendment would be that all ‘mandatory enforcement expenditures under the Act’ would be funded not by appropriated funds but by additional fees charged to those petitioning through the regular, legal immigration process.”

How high could these fees go up? They’re already in the thousands of dollars for many applications.

The proposed amendment says not only, “the Secretary may adjust the amounts of the fees and penalties . . .  except for [certain] fines and penalties,” but “If the Secretary determines that adjusting the fees and penalties set out [above] will be insufficient or impractical to cover the costs of the mandatory enforcement expenditures in this Act, the Secretary may charge an additional surcharge on every immigrant and nonimmigrant petition filed with the Secretary in an amount designed to be the minimum proportional surcharge necessary to recover the annual mandatory enforcement expenditures in this legislation.”

Ouch! Sky’s the limit!

If you’re an immigrant who already has a path to a visa or green card, the best advice I can give is to make sure the process moves forward as quickly as possible, to win the race against time and this new legislation.