Graduation-5502One of the unpredictable consequences of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the U.S. was that the number of foreign students coming to the U.S. plummeted — and remained low for several years thereafter. The reason was, in no small part, rumors indicating that many of the hijackers had come to the U.S. on student visas.

Only one of them did, actually, as detailed by FactCheck.org. The rest of the 19 hijackers mostly used business or tourist visas. But that fact did not slow down efforts to add security checks to the student visa application process and to the monitoring of students after arrival in the U.S. — efforts which went a little haywire and led, for a time, to massive delays, denials, and discouragement facing would-be foreign students.

Why should we care? Well, there’s the fact that foreign students tend to learn about the U.S. and adjust their preexisting stereotypes, — and vice versa as they meet U.S. students — potentially leading to greater worldwide understanding.

Foreign students also contribute financially, starting, but not ending, with their payments of tuition (out-of-state, in many cases). See this report from the American Immigration Council: “Record Number of International Students Add $24 billion to U.S. Economy.”

Also, the “bait and switch” aspects of American immigration law have always bothered me. We offer various visas and benefits, but then frequently treat the people who would like to take advantage of them as criminals, regardless of whether they’ve done the slightest thing to warrant suspicion.

In any case, things seem to have calmed down a bit, and statistics collected by the Institute of International Education show that, since approximately 2007, the numbers of foreign students in the U.S. have steadily risen. In 2013, the U.S. reached a record 819,644 foreign students, most of them from China, India, and South Korea. See the “Open Doors Data” portal for details.

And if you’re interested in studying in the U.S., the Nolo site offers a wealth of information in its “Student and Exchange Visitor Visas” section.