Larry Bodine recently observed that lawyers who expend a lot of energy on social media must ensure that their efforts yield a reasonable return.

That is sage advice. You’ve probably noticed that social media can be extremely demanding and distracting. Sometimes it can also be inconsequential. A bunch of (say) Twitter followers might look nice and feel good, but the reality is that if they don’t help grow your business, you’re playing games.

However, this is not to say (as Bodine does) that you should necessarily spend most of your time on LinkedIn or on any other channel. The optimal platform for your practice will be determined by the clients you serve.

Consider John Strouss, a local personal injury attorney who specializes in representing bike accident victims. He has a great market. The SF Bay Area is home to a very lively bicycle culture; the streets teem with commuting cyclists during rush hour, and accidents are an unfortunate but regular part of life. Do you think that most bike accident victims focus upon LinkedIn when they decide to seek counsel? Probably not.

If you take a look at how Strouss uses social media, you’ll quickly see how he has positioned himself. He maintains a LinkedIn profile, but his bike issues blog and Yelp profile do most of the work to fix his name among bicyclists. Local cyclists read the blog when they don’t have a problem because they share Strouss’ enthusiasm, but when they do run into a problem, his name comes to mind.

Of course, a blog and Yelp may not serve your business. That’s just it; there’s no magic bullet. But we can offer one useful proposition: identify your client base, discover its place on the Internet and break into the conversation.