How Many Green Cards Were Misdelivered?!

green cardThe title of the recent report from the U.S. Office of the Inspector General says it all: “Better Safeguards Are Needed in USCIS Green Card Issuance.”

According to the OIG’s findings, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) “continues to struggle to ensure proper Green Card issuance.”

Among other problems over the last three years, USCIS made mistakes on, or produced duplicate versions of, at least 19,000 cards. What’s more, the agency received over 200,000 reports from approved applicants saying that their cards went missing before they got them–in many cases, because the cards were sent to the wrong address.

The latter problem isn’t always USCIS’s fault. However, the OIG found that the number of misdelivered green cards could be reduced if the process for updating one’s address with USCIS were easier.

Do these problems affect only the immigrants awaiting a valid green card? Not if you’re, say, an employer waiting to hire a recent immigrant, or a concerned citizen wondering about whose house that misdirected green card actually went to!

If you are an immigrant and USCIS made an error on your green card, see Mistake on Your Green Card: Who Pays the Replacement Fee? for tips on getting a free replacement. And if you’re awaiting your green card, and plan to move, be sure to either submit your change of address online, call USCIS’s customer service number, 800-375-5283, or complete Form AR-11 (available at www.uscis.gov/ar-11) and mail it to the address listed on the form.

How to Make Your Nonprofit’s Emails Stand Out on Days Like Giving Tuesday

clock and faceAlthough it has been around only since 2012, Giving Tuesday (on the first Tuesday after Thanksgiving) has become the established “opening day” for year-end online donations to nonprofit organizations.

Last year (in 2015) for example, almost 700,000 online donors collectively gave over $116 million dollars to charitable causes, according to a report by ImpactLab.

Suffice it to say that no nonprofit wants to be left out of the action. And judging from the number of emails in my inbox this morning (they haven’t stopped yet!) most nonprofits have realized this fact. The sheer number of emails is verging on annoying–problematic, as it might lead some recipients to give up and delete the whole lot.

But politely staying out of the fray is no longer a realistic option. So the question becomes, how can a nonprofit distinguish itself from the others within an email subject line or (if it’s lucky and the recipient actually opens it) within the short space of an email?

Here’s what I’m observing various groups trying:

  • Matching gifts. Subject lines like, “Donations matched for Giving Tuesday!”, “Urgent: Your gift will go twice the distance today,” and “3-1 Match for Giving Tuesday Only” are so common that they hardly attract attention. But on the plus side, if a donor was already thinking about making a gift to a particular group, seeing a time-delimited match might tip the balance. Matching gifts also offer a subtle way with which to establish a group’s credibility, if the donor offering the match is well respected.
  • Specific reminders of what a gift will support. With every other nonprofit asking for money to help its cause, it can be eye-catching to see something like, “Send a Girl to School for $58” or “$50 will plant five native trees.”
  • An end-of-day goal. The National Wildlife Federation, for example, set a goal of receiving sufficient donations with which to “plant 5,000 native trees, in order to help wildlife survive and thrive for years to come.” On the one hand, such a goal seems rather arbitrary (couldn’t it wait until tomorrow?); on the other hand, it effectively reminds donors what their collective response can achieve.
  • Humor and/or baby seals. I did enjoy Oceana’s email subject line: “There’s a sea lion pup who wants you to open this email.” The photo inside is, of course, adorable. (Those baby seal pictures never get old!)

Sad to say, some of the email subject lines are just plain dull, such as, “Today we celebrate Giving Tuesday.” (That’s the only one I saved long enough to quote!) But at least that nonprofit didn’t sit this year’s Giving Tuesday out!

Trump Plan to Cap Itemized Deductions a Concern for Nonprofits

As has been widely reported, President-Elect Donald Trump’s plan to change the U.S. tax system includes placing a cap on itemized deductions–$100,000 for a single person, and $200,000 for a married couple.

Sound like plenty to cover your deductions? (It sure is for mine.)

But we all have cause for concern about the impact on U.S. nonprofit organizations, because charitable donations are on the list of potential U.S. tax deductions.

Suddenly, the wealthiest of donors will have less incentive to give. And there’s no question that tax deductions form a part, though not all, of donors’ motivations to give (witness the end-of-year donation rush).

This is especially troubling news when issued around the same time as a report from the Institute for Policy Studies, finding that recent growth in philanthropic giving is concentrated among a handful of high-income, high-wealth donors, while giving by lower- and middle-income donors is steadily declining–mirroring the increasing concentration of societal wealth.

If I were in charge of a nonprofit right now, I’d work extra hard on that end-of-year 2016 campaign to my wealthiest donors!

Online Places to Do Holiday Shopping for a Cause

holiday lightsA shout-out to Nonprofit Tech for Good for compiling a list of 30 Online Stores That Benefit Nonprofits, just in time for the start of the holiday shopping season.

My family could have used this the year I announced (in classic Berkeley style) that I wanted to reduce consumerism and overconsumption by having us give and get only gifts from nonprofits that year.

I think I confused them. I received things like shrunken wool sweaters from Goodwill.

Perhaps, like many people I’ve met, they have no idea what a nonprofit actually is. Fortunately, Nolo has an answer for that.

But the technical definition can’t possibly reflect the great variety of nonprofits that exist in the U.S., from service organizations with an online store on the side to museums and hospitals to Goodwill and its ilk.

You’ll find all of those on the list above, plus a few websites that are dedicated to selling goods and then forwarding the profits to various nonprofit organizations and causes.

Now, if only I could try on one of those beanies . . . .

If Obama Was “Deporter in Chief,” What Will Trump Be?

10year92_lgDuring President-Elect Donald Trump’s November 13, 2016 “60 Minutes” interview, he vowed to immediately deport up to three million immigrants. According to him, the U.S. needs to remove people who “are criminal and have criminal records, gang members, drug dealers.”

It sounds like a bold plan—but is it different from existing policy?

During President Barack Obama’s eight years in office, he earned the nickname “Deporter in Chief” from various immigration advocacy groups. His administration reportedly deported more than 2.5 million people from the United States.

And that doesn’t count the million-plus undocumented people who left the U.S. voluntarily or “self-deported” in recent years—in the case of Mexico, numbers that a Pew report said were higher than the number entering, as of late 2015.

And who, exactly, was tops on the list for the Obama administration’s deportation efforts? You can read the list yourself, in a 2011 memo by the Director of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

The memo explains that ICE’s top enforcement priorities (given that the agency lacks the resources with which to deport or remove every undocumented or otherwise deportable immigrant in the United States) include:

  • individuals who pose a clear risk to national security
  • serious felons, repeat offenders, or individuals with a lengthy criminal record of any kind
  • known gang members or other individuals who pose a clear danger to public safety, and
  • individuals with an egregious record of immigration violations, including those with a record of illegal re-entry and those who have engaged in immigration fraud.

Sound familiar? But according to Donald Trump, there are still three million criminals who haven’t been deported. Except that his numbers don’t seem to have a verifiable source. According to a 2015 study from the Migration Policy Institute, there are a mere 300,000 first-priority undocumented felons in the U.S. and 390,000 “serious misdemeanants.”

It’s little wonder that immigrants’ rights groups are raising concerns that Trump’s intention is to create a pretext with which to justify massive deportations regardless of criminal backgrounds.