Unnecessary Stents, Medical Fraud, and a Slow-Smoked Pig

A Baltimore cardiologist’s alleged pattern of unnecessarily inserting stents into patients is the subject of a recent U.S. Senate committee investigation and report. The story shines a spotlight on an emerging and disturbing trend in health care: doctors and hospitals churning out procedures that may or may not be necessary, and drug and medical device manufacturers rewarding those high-volume practices.

Articles in The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun can give you more details about the Senate report and all the garish attention paid to Dr. Mark Midei for inserting Abbott Laboratories stents into patients like he was going for some kind of record.

Those details include 585 stent procedures that weren’t medically necessary, and a celebratory $2,000-plus dinner featuring a slow-smoked pig, with the bill paid by Abbott Labs in order to honor Dr. Midei’s “achievements,” according to allegations. Meanwhile, every single procedure (necessary or not) brought lucrative profits, including Medicare reimbursements.

In non-emergency cases, stents are typically inserted only when an artery is completely or significantly blocked. That’s because the use of stents brings serious health risks — specifically, the increased chance that a patient will suffer blood clots, stroke, heart attack, and internal bleeding. And as the Times article points out, patients who have had stents inserted need to take blood-thinning drugs, and those medications come with their own unique risks.

So it’s not hard to see how inserting a stent when it’s not medically necessary to do so can rise to the level of medical malpractice. Cue the hundreds of lawsuits that have been filed against Dr. Midei and St. Joseph Medical Center, according to the Times.

Looking for more information on the legal issues behind this developing story? You’ll find dozens of articles and FAQs on medical malpractice cases and lawsuits involving medical devices in Nolo’s Medical Malpractice and Dangerous Products and Drugs sections.